Interview: Autism Is A Journey

Today I am very excited and honored to share an interview on a topic that I have wanted to post about for the longest time.

Autism touched my life 16 years ago, when I became close friends with, Diana, who I met while living in Florida who has a son that is autistic.

Up until that point, I had no awareness of autism.

Several years ago, I had the immense pleasure of meeting fellow-blogger, Bijoux at Bytes From The Burbs, who also has a child with autism. Periodically she will share posts about her daughter, which have always touched me. Such as it was last month, when Bijoux shared about a project her daughter was working on in college.

It was then that I got the idea of hosting an interview with her because I thought it would be educational and enlightening to those of you who might not know much about autism. So I contacted Bijoux and asked if she would agree to share an interview on my blog, and she did.

I have never met this lovely lady in person, but can tell that she is a kind, compassionate, open and VERY humorous soul. And I can also tell that she's an outstanding Mom.

So without further ado, I give you, Bijoux.

Welcome, my friend, and thank you for sharing this interview.

Please tell us some of your initial thoughts and feelings, when you first discovered that your daughter was autistic.

Oddly, I knew something wasn’t quite right in the first few weeks. She was my second child, and I found it disconcerting that I couldn’t get her to make eye contact or smile. Then we discovered she had some eye and heart defects, so we attributed her behavior to those medical issues. Starting at age 2 ½, we began the process of getting her evaluated, but it wasn’t until age 5 that she was formerly diagnosed. Even though I had suspected it for years, it was still difficult to hear. In 1997, there wasn’t a lot of information out there. From my previous career as a continuing education coordinator for medical/social workers, I knew quite a bit about classic autism. People with autism in those days were confined to group homes and institutions. Since this was pre-Internet, I spent my days researching autism at the library, gathering every piece of information I could get my hands on. My husband and I were committed to providing her with the most normal life as possible, so we started speech therapy, occupational therapy and at-home interventions immediately. As far as my feelings, there was a lot of crying and fear. There was definitely a period of grief for the loss of the ‘normal child’ I thought I had given birth to. I did not know how others would react, so we kept her diagnosis to close family members. It’s hard for me to admit this, but there was definitely an aspect of shame and not wanting anyone to know.

I know there are different functioning levels of autism. Please share a bit about your daughters.

She was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified by a neurological psychologist. She is considered high-functioning. She did not have enough of the characteristics of Asperger’s to get that diagnosis, nor is she as high-functioning as many Aspies we know. She is completely verbal, though she suffers in her pragmatic language skills and she also has a dysfluency problem (stuttering) that is non-related. Her gross and fine motor skills are below average (never able to ride a bike, although I am taking her to a special bike camp this summer, so keep your fingers crossed), can’t catch or hit a baseball, has trouble with scissors, zippers, etc. and is generally messy at most tasks. Has difficulty in social situations (can’t start a conversation or keep one going, no clue on how to join in) and is emotionally immature for her age (extreme difficulties spending the night away from home or in any new situation). Her strengths are in music and creative writing.


Overall, how do your daughters peers react and respond to her autism?

She was generally accepted by her peers from preschool to about grade 5. She had a nice group of friends and was invited to birthday parties, etc. I had her involved in Girl Scouts, so she also had that as a social resource. Unfortunately, after about age 10, her lack of social and emotional skills made her stand out. It was as though all her friends matured and she stayed the same. A big part of this is that her interests are immature for her age. She still played with American Girl dolls in middle/high school and watched the Disney Channel. She is also small and has a baby face, so even at age 21, she is still given a children’s menu at restaurants. She survived with one best friend in high school and a few outliers, who were really just friends with her best friend. Her one best friend has been a lifesaver though. She is a girl who had a brother (who has since passed away) with severe cerebral palsy, so she is extremely sensitive to those with disabilities. I do not know how my daughter would have gotten this far in life without her. A girl with Asperger’s at her community college also befriended her in a class her first year. Those are currently her only two social contacts. She did not have much trouble with bullying, it just got to the point where she was ignored by most classmates. It would have been nice if her peers had made an effort to include her (she WANTS to socialize, she just doesn’t understand HOW), but I also realize that teens aren’t known for maturity in social situations. Most are just trying to survive themselves.

What has been the biggest challenge?

For me, it has been the ‘perpetual childhood’ aspect of the disorder. I still feel as though I have a preschooler at times, driving her everywhere, reminding her to clean her mouth and take a shower, picking up after her because she is oblivious to her messes, calming her down when something is not working (like her Kindle). When you have children, you have hopes and dreams for them, and the knowledge that they will one day leave you and be on their own. We will never have that with our daughter. Even though she’s in the process of earning an Associate’s Degree, I can already see that she will not be able to hold a regular job and her lack of motor skills and common sense don’t make it likely that she will ever drive. It’s a worry that never leaves you….what will happen when I am gone?

What has been the greatest joy?

Watching her try so hard to do something and finally succeed. It’s usually the littlest things that bring the greatest joy. I remember how much she wanted to blow out her birthday candles at age 5. She struggles with any task that requires verbal explanation, so imagine trying to explain how to blow out a candle. It’s hard to explain or demonstrate (you can’t see air!), especially because we really didn’t understand why she couldn’t do it. She was finally able (though to this day, it still takes her a number of tries) and the look on her face, followed by the exclamation, “I DID IT!” was priceless. There is also a lot of joy in the humor that she brings to our family. Most people with autism are brutally honest. It’s actually difficult for her to lie, and when she does, she will immediately tell on herself. Her viewpoint is so different from the rest of ours, she can be quite hilarious at times, without meaning to be, and she also has trouble understanding when someone else is trying to be funny. This year she took college biology and she told me, with a straight face, “Today in class, we looked at a healthy pig’s lungs, and the lungs of a pig who smoked.” After I regained my composure, I asked her if she really thought a pig had smoked. She thought about it and then said, “No, but that’s what the professor said!”


Is there any advice or support you can give to parents with autistic children, as far as things that you have learned through this journey?

Read as much as possible on the topic, attend conferences on autism, find a support group of parents who can relate to what you are going through and be a network of exchanging ideas, and never give up on your child. They will always surprise you! The biggest thing I’ve learned is that autism is a disorder with a myriad of symptoms. Although some of the general characteristics may be the same, no two people with autism will present the same way. Erase Rain Man from your head. My daughter is horrible with numbers!

Thank you so much, Bijoux....x

*Please feel free to direct your comments to Bijoux, as she will be responding to them personally.

More information: Autism Speaks


92 comments

  1. Good morning Ronnie & Bij,
    Ronnie; sorry I was not over last Friday. Hubby was home and PC hungry :).
    I am saying "bless you both". I am touched and feeling warm to read this interview. I am going this morning to see a Mom with an autistic son. So, I see and feel all the Mommys put into their children. I truly do and that is really unusual for someone like me ( I have no children) to say. Behind every autistic child or adult is a Mommy, Daddy, and family.
    Yes, the future is the scary part for austitic children. If today is a present, tomorrow is a promise but also a concern. My autistic friend is 7 so, the family is concerned about development, socialization and yes, eventual schooling( following his rhythm, of course)

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  2. Rob LenihanMay 20, 2013

    My God, what a touching, beautiful post.

    Ron, thanks for putting this together, and Bijoux, thank you so much for sharing this insight into your experiences with your daughter.

    It was heartbreaking to read how you wonder what will happen to your daughter when you're gone. And it was so lovely to see how the littlest things give you joy.

    I've never met you in person, either, but after reading this interview I feel as if I know you so much better. Thanks again and do take care.

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  3. Thanks For your kind words, Barb, and thank you for your own contributions to the lives of others with the disorder.

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  4. Thanks, Rob. It can be heartbreaking, but also a joy to raise any child with a disability. I appreciate your kindness!

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  5. Hi Val,
    Sadly, autism and depression do go hand in hand. I'm sorry that your stepson hasn't gotten a diagnosis. It's definitely one of the most frustrating parts of autism....getting the diagnosis!

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  6. hi bijoux, thanks for sharing your honest and genuine story. i have heard of autism but never knew the inside struggles of what a child/parent goes through. even though your daughter has challenges, she also is accomplishing great things for herself. associates degree, that's great! she may not be at the speed of others, but that's fine. the only person she needs to be better than is the person she was yesterday. she sounds like she's working toward that. continued success to you, your daughter and your family.


    hey, ron.

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  7. AkelamaluMay 20, 2013

    Thankyou to Bijoux for sharing her, and her daughter's, experience of Autism and thankyou Ron for organising the enlightening interview. x

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  8. Thank you, LadyV! I like how you put that.......better than yesterday. Yes!

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  9. You are welcome, Akelamalu.

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  10. SuziCateMay 20, 2013

    What an interesting and enlightening post. Thank you for sharing your journey with us. Blessings to you and your family.

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  11. Yeah! It's working for me too!

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  12. Hey there Valerie!

    Yaaaaaaaaaay! I think I figured out why that sometimes happens. It may be because of using an iPad. Bijoux had the same problem last week when she was using hers, but when she used her desktop, she was able to leave a comment.

    Anyway, glad you were able to leave a comment this morning and thanks so much for stopping by!

    X

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  13. Thanks so much, SuziCate.

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  14. Hey V Girl!


    Thanks so much for stopping by!

    X

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  15. Thanks a bunch for stopping by, Pearl!


    X

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  16. Hi Denise,
    It definitely helped that she was raised in a zero tolerance for bullying era, at least compared to when we were kids. Thanks for your encouragement.

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  17. Hey there Rob!


    You are so welcome!


    I felt so honored and blessed to share this interview with Bijoux!


    Thanks for stopping by, buddy, and have a terrific week!


    X

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  18. Dianne WilsonMay 20, 2013

    I think I am most touched by the one friend who was always there - as we get older we learn that's all we need
    I wish society was better at celebrating all the things that make us different and special rather than suspecting and judging
    Ron, I have often shared with you my feeling that we are all on a spectrum in terms of our sexuality, our emotions, our thoughts, our abilities and so on
    No one place is better than another, unfortunately some places are easier
    And that's the heartache, the challenge, and the inspiration to do better for one another


    Hugs Bijoux - you're wonderful

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  19. Bonjour Barb!


    No worries, my friend :) Hope you had a super weekend!


    Thanks so much for stopping by today and reading this interview. I had a feeling (with the volunteer work you're doing with autistic children) you would really enjoy hearing Bijoux's thoughts.


    Have a wonderful week!

    X to you and D!

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  20. Hola Denise~


    Much thanks for stopping by, girl!


    Isn't Bijoux faaaaaaaaabulous??????


    Have a great week...X

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  21. Great interview. As the parent of a kid with Tourette's syndrome, I know how hard life can be, and how difficult it is to explain it to others.

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  22. Thank you so much, Dianne. Having one good friend is a true blessing for us all.

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  23. Thank you for stopping by, Suzi....X

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  24. Hey there Lady Dianne!

    "Ron, I have often shared with you my feeling that we are all on a spectrum in terms of our sexuality, our emotions, our thoughts, our abilities and so on."

    Yes, and you are so spot on about that.

    "No one place is better than another, unfortunately some places are easier And that's the heartache, the challenge, and the inspiration to do better for one another"



    Love how you shared that, Dianne!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, dear lady!


    ((((((( You )))))))


    X to you, Hope, Siren, and Isadora!

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  25. Yahoooo! I was so hoping it would all go smooth for our interview today. And it has :)

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  26. hi! I highly respect your courage in speaking out. my adult daughter is disabled with mental illness but we didn't realize it till she went to college and suffered a complete breakdown! the if-onlies.... but openness is the only answer to intricacies of the mind. our society likes its illnesses to be straightforward and the mind is anything but. since I too am mentally I'll, I know of what I speak.

    now it looks as if my grandson may need a dx but the parents must get onboard. one can hope.... I mentioned it when he was 18 mths! he's now 6 but I understand it's frightening. stil..... I can almost predict where things may be headed. nuf said!

    thanks for sharing and thanks, ron, for giving Bijoux the space to speak on your blog. xxxxx

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  27. Outstanding interview, Bijoux! Very enlightening indeed.


    Like Dianne, I was most touched by the one friend who was always there for your daughter. And also that she is in the process of earning an Associates Degree. You and your husband must be very proud. What a huge accomplishment!


    Thank you for sharing your journey with us, Bijoux.


    And Ron, thank you for organizing this interview. It was great!

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  28. I know you really understand, dale, what a parent and child goes through. Thanks.

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  29. Any disorder related to the brain is frustrating, as there isn't a blood test to diagnose. I've read that many of these mental disorders are connected and have to do with chromosome 17. I'm hopeful that one day we will have answers and treatment.

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  30. Thanks, Matt. Her friend has helped her self esteem so much. A few years back, she even encouraged her to ask a boy to homecoming and included them in all the photos and the restaurant beforehand. A great memory for my daughter, to be included.

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  31. Thank you for stopping by, Dale!

    X

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  32. Hi Bij,
    ((((((( Bij & daughter)))))))
    I am in there batting with you and all autistic children & adults. It takes a personal touch to really be changed, such as with Ron's friends and my niece. Thank you for your heartfelt words.
    I swear; if my little friend gets admitted to school, it will be a proud day for me.
    Be well,
    Barb

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  33. Hey there Linda!


    You are so welcome, my friend. I have wanted to share an interview on this topic for such a long time, so I am utterly grateful and honored that Bijoux agreed to do this.


    Thanks so much for stopping my!


    xxxxx

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  34. Hiya Matt!


    And thank YOU for stopping by, buddy! This interview was so enjoyable to put together with Bijoux!


    Have a great week!


    X

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  35. I have a friend in Ohio with an autistic son. He is not high-functioning and I know it's a real struggle for her - especially being a single mom - but I am forever impressed by her love for and patience with her boy. It's inspiring, and brings perspective. Thanks for sharing your story!

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  36. My pleasure. I should say that I always read your blog, but new phone upgrade has enabled me to comment now as well.

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  37. There are some things that I couldn't possibly tell anyone about our experience with Tourette's, which makes it very tough to help people understand what we went through.
    I salute any parent who deals with such a traumatic affliction.

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  38. Aw, thank you, Dale.

    Yes, apparently Disqus has been working on adding the "mobile feature" to Blogger blogs. But sometimes there's still a glitch with iPads for some reason.

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  39. I'm an Android boy myself. And it's the addition of a new browser that has assisted me.

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  40. Excellent! Glad to hear that, Dale!

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  41. You are welcome, Matt. I rely on my spouse for emotional support, so I know how hard it must be for your friend. I hope she has a good network of friends.

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  42. Ron and Bijoux, thank you for putting this piece together. Autism is such a misunderstood condition and reading these inner thoughts is so very heartwarming. We have cousins with a son (second of three) who is autistic and have seen both the struggles and the joy that accompanies their role as parents. Education and resources have come a long way in the last 10 years, but the future is still scary for these wonderful children. My prayers go out to everyone who loves an autistic child.

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  43. Thanks, Lisa! Prayers are always welcome.

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  44. What an insightful post! Thank you Bijoux for sharing your story. Thankfully, we are moving forward with Autism awareness and often see people with autism on our TV screens. At least in the UK we do.

    It must be a struggle and heartbreaking at times but, as you say, there will be times of joy too.

    Thank you Ron, for this post :)

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  45. I didn't know all this about autism. Thanks for educating me today!

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  46. Thanks so much for stopping by Mark!


    X to you and Tara!

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  47. Hi Lisa!


    Thanks a bunch for stopping by, my friend. Bijoux and I had a great time putting this post together.

    X

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  48. Congrats! I have nominated you for the Liebster award. Please go to the post where I nominated your blog. There you will find 11 questions to answer as an acceptance for the award and it is now your task to nominate 11 worthy bloggers!

    http://cestlavie22.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/always-making-a-late-entrance/

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  49. Herman TurnipMay 20, 2013

    Wow. Amazing interview. It's difficult to fully comprehend the challenges both parents and child must overcome, but it's a universal truth that it's all worth it to see a smile on their child's face. Having a sister with muscular dystrophy, I know how difficult it was for her growing up. But in the end she found a wonderful husband and now has two beautiful children. You never know what the future will bring!

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  50. Hello Shae!

    GREAT too see ya!!!!!

    OMG...I was just thinking of you this past weekend and wondering where you were because you've been missed, girl! Hope all is well and that you're enjoying this beautiful spring.

    Thank you soooooooo much for the nomination because I truly appreciate it and am touched. However, I don't participate in awards or memes; I haven't for many, many years. But I will be sure to stop by your blog tomorrow and read your post.

    Welcome back, girl! And thanks for stopping by!

    X

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  51. Hi Bijoux,

    Thank you for sharing your child with us. The information really enlightened me as I don't really know many details other than what I see represented in television shows or movies. I'm so glad your daughter has her special girlfriend from high school. One great friend outweighs all the casual ones. :-)

    Ron,

    Thanks for organizing this interview and introducing us to your friend.

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  52. You are welcome, Babs. Awareness leads to acceptance.

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  53. Glad to be a teacher, Debbie. Thanks for reading.

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  54. What a courageous young lady. And equally courageous mom. And oh, the stigma's everyone's getting to wade through and deal with. How could you not be proud of the kiddo/mom who's waded through it all and continues to persevere.

    I don't know the heartache, having not been personally affected by the disorder, I just don't know the degree of pain that's been involved in getting to this point--equally, I don't know the degree of joy either.
    But I do know my own ignorance, my own awkwardness, my struggle when we cross paths with kiddos or adults who've been affected. I'm humbled to admit I don't fare well--totally out of my element and totally inadequate in how I interact. Oh, I'm polite and kindly--but I lack the ability to 'connect' and feel like I'm REALLY present in the interaction. In part, it's lack of information and lack of exposure.....and, in part, there's undoubtedly fear.
    I apologize for all of us ignorant, fearful folks--especially the ones who can't or won't muster up the graciousness to be KIND, above all things.

    I'm eternally grateful for those who soar in the work they do with kiddos/adults that fall in the autism spectrum. I consider them angles. And I applaud those who've persevered in parenting, chasing what's best for their kiddo--sometimes at a huge cost to them, emotionally, physically and financially.
    And I'll persevere to learn more and fear less--to work to improve how I connect with ALL of G-d's precious children.

    THAT'S the power of sharing what's TRUE.
    And I thank you for that--hugely.

    ((((((( Ron )))))))))
    (((((( Bijoux )))))))))
    (((((((((((((( the kiddo )))))))))))))))))))

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  55. You are welcome, Babs. And thank YOU for stopping by!

    X to you and Mo!

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  56. Thank you for stopping by, Debbie!

    X

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  57. Thank you so much, Pamela, and best wishes to our aunt, uncle and cousin. I really appreciate your kind words.

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  58. That's a wonderful testimony, Herman. Thank you!

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  59. You are welcome, Chrissy. Thanks for your comment.

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  60. Mel.....wow! Thanks for your honesty! I don't always know how to react either, to differently abled people. It can be awkward, for sure. My husband is so much better at it than me. He will always go up to nonverbal kids in wheelchairs and talk to them. I tend to hang back, unsure of what to say, and also fearful that I will cry because I understand the heartache of the parent. Just do what you are comfortable doing.

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  61. Thanks, Mary! I did not go into detail, but she has played keyboard for over ten years and takes voice lessons as well. She continues to perform at recitals for the place she takes lessons from.

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  62. Hellooooooo Pam!

    Much thanks for stopping by and for your kind, sweet, and uplifting words!


    Isn't Bijoux an awesome lady?

    (((((( You ))))))

    X

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  63. Hey there Herman!


    Much thanks for stopping by and sharing on this post, buddy!


    X to you, Karin, and Mr. Tyler!

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  64. Hey Chrissy Girl!


    You are so welcome. Bijoux and I had a great time putting this interview together. I was honored to share her story.


    Thanks for stopping by.....X

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  65. Hey there Mary!


    Much thanks for stopping by, neighbor!


    X

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  66. Hiya Mel!


    (((((((( You )))))))


    Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing on this post, dear lady!


    X

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  67. Wow. Just wow. What a touching, heartfelt, and beautiful post. Thank you for sharing your story, Bijoux.

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  68. Bijoux, thank you so very much for sharing yourself so candidly and honestly. Ron's right, you sound like an awesome lady and Mom!


    It delights me to read how high-functioning your daughter is. WOW...an Associates Degree! You and your husband must be very proud.


    You have certainly share some wonderful information and knowledge on autism. Thank you, Bijoux. The all the very best to you, your daughter and family!


    Ron, wonderful interview. Great questions!

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  69. I enjoyed this post, and of course know Bijoux from way back. I'm really glad to hear bullying isn't a problem. Teens are generally fairly oblivious, though, as their own brains are busy re0structuring diring that time making them a self-focused lot.

    An important post, since awareness is the key to increasing understanding and reducing prejudice. Well done, both of you!

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  70. My "rented" son has a sister whose daughter has autism. I learned a lot from her. Her daughter is incredible and her mom is even better! How wonderful for you to post about this.... it scares me that there are so many autistic children today.... I pray their futures are bright!

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  71. Thank you for your kind words, Robert. Much appreciated!

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  72. Hey Agent! Yes, as much as I wanted her peers to include her more, I also realized they've got their own issues. We all do! Thanks for stopping by. I'm on my way to your place shortly.

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  73. Hi Katherine. It is scary how many kids are being diagnosed today. 1 in 88. I truly believe they are close to finding a common link and that maybe we can work towards prevention.

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  74. You're welcome, Jeanne.

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  75. Thanks so much for stopping by Jeanne :)


    X to you and the girlz!

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  76. Thanks so much for stopping by, Katherine!


    X

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  77. Thanks a bunch for stopping by, Agent! Bijoux and I had a great time putting this interview together.


    X

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  78. Thanks so much for stopping by, Robert!


    X

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  79. Much thanks for stopping by, Meleah!


    X

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  80. Hey, Ron - can you point me in the direction of the blog that talks about Portland's weirdness? I'd love to check it out. Thanks!

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  81. Sure Mark! I will email you the blog URL.

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  82. Thank you, Ron, for this opportunity to share my experience. Your encouragement and caring attitude helps so many of us here.

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  83. You are soooooooo welcome, my friend!



    And thank YOU!!!!!


    It has a been an honor to share your experience here!


    As I share in my email to you, I had a feeling your experience would enlighten and educate others. And it has, and will continue to do so for anyone who reads this post in the future.


    ((((((( You ))))))))


    Much X to you, your daughter (s) and family!

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  84. What a wonderful post. I have a very close friend who has a son with Asperger's. He's extremely high functioning and will be graduating high school in a couple of weeks. I know that they have had some challenges along the way but she has found a lot of support in the community.

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  85. Hey there Jen!

    Thanks a bunch for stopping by and reading this interview. Bijoux and I had a wonderful time putting this together!

    X

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  86. Good morning, Ron! Autism is a great topic for your interview because awareness so important. Since there is a range of complexity to it, for some, it's hard to understand. Thank you, Bijoux, for sharing some information and experiences you've had with your daughter. I'm sure your journey has been filled with much emotion.
    Her brutal honesty must be quite funny at times. :) Endearing, too.
    I'm sure she'll continue to have many 'I DID IT' moments because it seems that you and your family have done all that you can to support and encourage her (especially with her strengths of music and creative writing!) while learning and growing through the experience yourselves.
    Bike camp sounds awesome! I hope she enjoys it.

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  87. First I would like to say, thank you, Ron, for sharing this post, and Bijoux with us. You are the dearest, sweetest man. I love you. ((HUGS))


    Bijoux, I admire you as a woman and a mom. It’s not easy being a mom to begin with. Having a child with special needs takes a special one. One with extra courage, patience and perseverance.
    You sound like you have an over abundance of all three.


    I felt heartbroken when I read about your fear of the future and who will help your daughter when you’re gone. Then I felt such happiness when you told us about the joys your daughter brings to your life—The ups and downs of parenting.


    I won’t pretend to fully understand what you have gone through and what you still have to endure. I can sympathize a little, though, because I have a cousin who has Asperger syndrome. My Aunt and
    Uncle are finally able to move to their retirement home they’ve been building for the last 10 years. It hasn’t been an easy road for them, and it probably will always be a bit bumpy, but at least my
    cousin has the help he needs and the love and support of his family.


    All families should have that. I think a lot of it has to do with
    knowledge. And society needs to be empowered with awareness. We are all in this together.



    ((HUGS))

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  88. To both Bijoux and Ron, wonderful interview!

    Bijoux, thank you for sharing so openly and honestly about your feelings when you found out your daughter was autistic. I would imagine that any parent would have those same feelings.

    I was very happy to read that your daughter didn't experience any bullying in school because children can be cruel at times. I know, because I was teased for being overweight.

    You have definitely enlightened me more about autism, so thank you. And congratulations to your daughter working towards an associate degree. That is awesome!

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  89. Val DaggattJuly 07, 2013

    Heehee, Ron, Disqus knew me today.

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  90. Val DaggattJuly 07, 2013

    Wonderful post, Ron, thank you for organising it. Thanks also to you, Bijoux, for the enlightening information about autism. I can understand how difficult it must have been for you over the years. I have a grown stepson who has the symptoms of an Asperger's sufferer yet medics say not, claiming there is nothing wrong with him except severe depression. I don't like that word 'depression'. Wishing you and your daughter well and thank you again.

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  91. Wonderful post Ron...so much people do not know about autism. The future really is the scary part for those kids...and their parents!! Thank you for sharing!
    xo
    Jeanne

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