The Beauty Within Urban Decay

Friday, August 30, 2013


I would like to share this pictorial post differently than I normally do.

So if you would, please look through the photos I took first, and then I will share my thoughts afterward.

And I ask that you view them closely; noticing the decaying details.

Thank you...









Oddly enough, there is something about urban decay that I find beautiful.

And not only how it looks, but how it feels.

Reverent.

I’ve seriously pondered why I find such beauty in decay, and I think I know the reason.

It’s actually the same reason why I hold reverence for our elderly, and why I view them beautiful as well.

Urban decay is a reminder for me.

I can look at decay in two ways:

*I can see it as something depressing and sad for what was once new and physically intact.

*Or I can see it for the value it still holds.

We will all eventually age and produce wrinkles, sunspots, lose hair, lose mobility, and gradually go through the process of physical decay.

Just like an aging building does, with its chipped paint, discoloration, broken windows, and its loss of original structure.

However, when I look at urban decay or our elderly, that’s not what I see.

Not really.

I see beauty within the decay.

The wisdom.
The knowledge.
The story.
And the energy and spirit that went into creating it.

So the next time you look at a decaying building or an elderly person, and you think, “Oh, how sad....they're getting so old."

Look closer. Deeper.

Because the beauty and value they contribute to this world, is still there.

Decay and age are only the reminders.

That it's still beautiful...

I saw this adorable woman sitting in the food court the other day, and she brought a HUGE smile to my heart. Yup...still bringing beauty and color to the world!

Have a beautiful weekend everyone!
X

54 Comments:

  1. Jeanne Pursell said...:

    You have such an awesome perspective on life, Ron! I always come over here to see what interesting and thought-provoking post you have up for discussion! I love that you find such beauty and joy in everyday life! Awesome photos...you have obviously mastered your new camera. You bring joy to my world each day. Happy Weekend to you and hope you have some time off this holiday weekend. After many years of working in retail, I remember those LONG sale days very well! Xo Jeanne

  1. barbj92 said...:

    Good morning Ron,
    How are you?
    I love your photos and your thoughts on elders and the aging process. If those bricks could talk and If we would only listen more to the elders, too.
    I love the soul of these places. A lot of them unfortunately have been knocked down already. My family's old Church ( St Bonifice, in the Frankford station vicinity), has either been already destroyed or soon to be.
    Enjoy your week and sending my best wishes.

  1. Valerie said...:

    Now look what you've done ... you've brought a bit of dampness to my eyes. I got all emotional looking at the pictures, although I have to admit that I never saw beauty in decay before. My first reaction was anger that those beautiful buildings had been left in such a state but now I see what you mean. Looking deeper, there IS beauty.


    Your remarks made me feel better about myself, hence the almost-tears. I was feeling a bit jaded so it's understandable. Since hubby's operation I've had to do (willingly) everything, all the driving, housework, etc. but this morning he told me that my driving was still excellent, more like a 50 year old ... and now you've sort of confirmed that I'm as old as I feel.


    Thank you for this post, Ron, you always, ALWAYS manage to post interesting topics. Have a wonderful weekend x

  1. Bijoux said...:

    Great analogy and photos! Heck, some of the buildings looked just fine to me! Very beautiful and dignified, those old brick buildings are. You know my oldest daughter has a heart for working with the elderly. She thinks they are all so special. Teaches me a thing or two about patience!

  1. meleahrebeccah said...:

    Oh, Ron!

    I love this post. And I love you!


    "I see beauty within the decay.

    The wisdom.

    The knowledge.

    The story.

    And the energy and spirit that went into creating it."


    AMEN TO THAT!

  1. ladyV said...:

    awesome post, ron. when i read the title i had the biggest grin on my face because i knew i was in for a treat. well done my friend. my eyes are even a little watery because i feel what you mean. i love the elderly too. mostly because they are past the nonsense and always have a story of wisdom to tell. i don't know how you turn out these fantastic posts week after week. you have such a gift with words and know how to tug at my heart strings. thank you and i'm glad to have you as a friend. gotta see you soon!


    xo

  1. Rob Lenihan said...:

    Excellent photos, Ron, and what a fabulous vision you have!
    You choose to see beauty where so many us would see decay and you love what most people would scorn.

    Old buildings, like old people, have a million stories to tell, if we only take the time to listen. We're too quick to tear down old buildings, just like we're too quick to shove our seniors into nursing homes.

    A blogging buddy of mine records images of fading ads that he sees on the side of buildings and I think you might like it. (Forgive me if I already gave you this link.) http://www.fadingad.com/fadingadblog/

    Have a tremendous holiday weekend, buddy, and take care!

  1. Shae said...:

    You know I have always loved "old" buildings but I will admit I am one of the ones that like the old buildings that still look majestic and gorgeous. Not too far from me there is this gorgeous Victorian home that has been run down and not kept up for as long as I can remember. Well recently a construction company bought it and they have been working on restoration and I have anxiously watched each new development. The home still has its rustic spirit but it is now something a family would want to live it.

    I think I need to take a page out of your book and appreciate the beauty even when it might be hard to see.

  1. Denise said...:

    Ron, once again your words brought tears to eyes. I love your perspective on how you see things. You always make me think and feel.

    "Because the beauty and value they contribute to this world, is still there.
    Decay and age are only the reminders."



    That is so true! I have always had a sensitive spot in my heart for our elderly. I too see them as something that should be revered and respected because they are knowledge and wisdom. As you said, we all age and go through physical decay, but we still hold value.


    Thank you for sharing this post, Ron. It was just beautiful!


    Have a wonderful weekend!

  1. I recently took a trip to New Orleans and saw the same type of sagging and decay and thought it was beautiful. Paul asked me why I was taking pictures of crumbling buildings and I told him "Because I can"

  1. Ron said...:

    Goooooood morning Jeanne!


    Thank you for your sweet words, dear lady :)


    Even when as a kid, I was always attracted and interested in things that were older than myself. I much preferred hanging with the adults and listening intently to what they would share. Also, I always loved things such as, old buildings and objects that held a deep, rich history within them. When others found them just "old", I found them beautiful.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, Jeanne! Have a wonderful holiday weekend!


    X to you and the girlz!

  1. Ron said...:

    Gooood Morning Barb!

    Thank you :)

    " If those bricks could talk and If we would only listen more to the elders, too.I love the soul of these places."

    Yes, that's it exactly....the SOUL of these places!!!!

    This is one of the main reasons why I loved Japan, because they hold such respect for their elderly and deep history.

    "My family's old Church ( St Bonifice, in the Frankford station vicinity), has either been already destroyed or soon to be."



    There is an old church on Spring Garden street, which the city contemplated tearing down at one point. However, the residences in the area were in an uproar that it should be restored and NOT teared down. I'm not exactly sure, but I think the city changed its mind and did restore it.


    Thanks for stopping by, Barb! Have a lovely weekend!


    X to you and D!

  1. Akelamalu said...:

    I love your way of looking at things Ron, beauty is definitely in the eye of beholder. xx

  1. Ron said...:

    Gooood morning Valerie!

    "My first reaction was anger that those beautiful buildings had been left in such a state but now I see what you mean. Looking deeper, there IS beauty."

    Yes, I can totally understand your feeling because when you initially look at these buildings it does make you feel sad or angry that they have been left in this state. I have to say, Philadelphia does an amazing job in restoring and keeping most of our historical buildings in this city because they have pride in them. Unfortunately, this takes money, so some sit for years until they can afford to restore them. In the meantime, I still see the beauty in them; peeking through the decay.

    "Since hubby's operation I've had to do (willingly) everything, all the driving, housework, etc. but this morning he told me that my driving was still excellent, more like a 50 year old ... and now you've sort of confirmed that I'm as old as I feel."



    You GO, girl!


    And I have to say to you, whenever I think of you or read your words in your posts, I see such a YOUTHFUL spirit in you. And I REALLY mean that!


    (((((((( You ))))))


    Much thanks for stopping by, dear lady. Have a beautiful weekend!

    X

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey there Bijoux!

    Thank you :)

    " Heck, some of the buildings looked just fine to me! Very beautiful and dignified, those old brick buildings are."

    And to me as well! And if you really think about it, back then the way in which this buildings were constructed (with such quality and great care), we should applaud them for still standing after these years.

    "You know my oldest daughter has a heart for working with the elderly. She thinks they are all so special."



    And I do TOO!!! Even when I was child, I loved being the elderly more so than people own age.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend. Have a wonderful holiday weekend!


    X

  1. barbj92 said...:

    Happy weekend to you too, Ron.
    I found a link that shows how they did tear down poor old St Boniface. My grandparents were marries there in 1919.

    http://nakedphilly.com/kensington-2/update-saint-boniface-homes-are-nearly-finished/

    The times are a changin... It is sad to see this part of "progress".
    X
    B

  1. Ron said...:

    Hiya Meleah!!!


    Love you too, dear friend!


    ((((((((((( You )))))))))


    Truly, when I look at these buildings or our elderly, that's what I see - the energy and spirit that went into creating them.


    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Have a faaaaabulous holiday weekend!


    Holy shit, I can't believe summer's over. Yet, I am so looking forward to FALL!!!!!


    X

  1. Ron said...:

    Thanks so much for sharing the link, Barb!


    I will check out sometime today!
    X

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey there V Girl!

    " i love the elderly too. mostly because they are past the nonsense and always have a story of wisdom to tell."



    AMEN!!!!!!!!


    And you know, when I lived in Japan, that's how they feel about their elderly. I've never seen a country that respects and holds their elderly in such high regard as they do. And I think that's how it should be everywhere.


    Our elderly leave a rich legacy.


    Much thanks for stopping by and for your sweet words, girl. And yes, I'm glad to have you as a friend as well! We gotta go to NYC one more time before the holidays, okay?


    Have a super holiday weekend!


    X

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey there Rob!

    "Old buildings, like old people, have a million stories to tell, if we only take the time to listen. We're too quick to tear down old buildings, just like we're too quick to shove our seniors into nursing homes."



    I soooooooo agree!!!! Age is knowledge, so it should be revered and respected. And it's the same with old buildings because they contain knowledge and beauty as well. I can actually feel the energy from an old building; almost as if its talking to me.


    Much thanks for sharing the link. I will definitely check it out sometime this weekend. Can't wait!


    Have a FABU holiday weekend, buddy!


    X

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey there Shae!

    You know I have always loved "old" buildings but I will admit I am one of the ones that like the old buildings that still look majestic and gorgeous."

    Yes, you said it perfectly....MAJESTIC and GORGEOUS!

    "Well recently a construction company bought it and they have been working on restoration and I have anxiously watched each new development. The home still has its rustic spirit but it is now something a family would want to live it."



    OMG...that's AWESOME!!!!


    I have to say that Philly is great about restoring our old, historical buildings within the city; keeping the rustic-look intact, but almost giving it a slight face lift. Unfortunately it takes money, so sometimes the buildings sit for years. But in the meantime, I can still look at them and see the beauty within the decay.


    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Have a wonderful holiday weekend!


    X

  1. lisa said...:

    Oh my, Ron, this is beautiful. Your photos are awesome and your analogy is equally lovely. Sometimes I look at old buildings and can really appreciate the historical character....decay and all. Often times, there is an exquisite loveliness to them. But I have to admit, many times I look at decrepit buildings and only see an owner who simply doesn't care enough to restore or fix what is falling apart!! When it comes to people, we are all beautiful, regardless of age. Too bad our culture doesn't value age as much as beauty. I think that's why Dad's Honor Flight touched me so....it was commemorating a generation that is most definitely aging (sometimes not very gracefully) and reinforcing just how amazing and beautiful they are. Great post today. I really enjoyed it. Hope you have a fantastic holiday weekend.

  1. babs (beetle) said...:

    If only more people looked at life the way you do Ron. Sadly many people see age as a negative and ugly thing. They see the elderly as people to ridicule instead of people who could teach them a thing or two about life.


    Another great post, Ron.

  1. Ron said...:

    Hola Denise!

    "I too see them as something that should be revered and respected because they are knowledge and wisdom. As you said, we all age and go through physical decay, but we still hold value."



    Yes! And I just shared the same thing in a few of my responding comments to others, that our elderly are knowledge and wisdom, therefore, should be held and revered with respect. In Japan, this how they are with their elderly. Heaven help you if you don't get up on a bus or subway to give your seat to one the elderly. They actually have signs on their public transportation that say something like, "Respect Our Elderly And Give Them Your Seat."


    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Have super-duper holiday weekend!


    X

  1. Ron said...:

    " Paul asked me why I was taking pictures of crumbling buildings and I told him "Because I can"


    *clapping loudly*


    You GO, Bill!!!!!


    I've never been to New Orleans, but have heard such wonderful things about the architecture there.


    Much thanks for stopping by, bud. Have a FABU holiday weekend!


    X to you and Paul!

  1. Ron said...:

    " beauty is definitely in the eye of beholder. "


    You said, m'dear!


    Much thanks for stopping by, Pearl! Have a lovely weekend!


    X

  1. Ron said...:

    "They see the elderly as people to ridicule instead of people who could teach them a thing or two about life."

    Amen, Babs, and hallelujah!!!!!!!



    This is one of the many things that I loved about living in Japan one summer. They hold their elderly in such HIGH regard and with SUCH respect, that it brings tears to your eyes. Because you realize how most of us have such a distorted look on VALUE.


    All of the Japanese public transportation has signs on them that say something like, "Respect Our Elders, And Give Them Your Seat."


    Right on!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend. Have a lovely weekend!


    X to you and Mo!

  1. Ron said...:

    Good morning Lisa!

    Thank you :)

    "Sometimes I look at old buildings and can really appreciate the historical character....decay and all. Often times, there is an exquisite loveliness to them. But I have to admit, many times I look at decrepit buildings and only see an owner who simply doesn't care enough to restore or fix what is falling apart!!"

    Yes, there is a difference between neglect and "I don't care", and a historical building that might be decaying, yet has character. Here in Philly, the city really does do an amazing job in keeping our history intact. Unfortunately that takes money, so sometimes a building will sit for awhile until they can get to it. But even so, I can still see the beauty within.

    "I think that's why Dad's Honor Flight touched me so....it was commemorating a generation that is most definitely aging (sometimes not very gracefully) and reinforcing just how amazing and beautiful they are."



    Yes! Yes! Yes! And that's why your beautiful post brought tears to my eyes when I read it. The honor commemorating a generation and reinforcing just how amazingly beautiful and VALUED they are! Truly, that was such a wonderful post!


    Much thanks for stopping by, my friend. Have a FANTABULOUS holiday weekend!


    X

  1. Mark Petruska said...:

    There's a fine line between urban decay and urban blight, and I think you've captured the essence of the former beautifully. I love these shots and agree with you that there is beauty within. Maybe nobody buys a wedding dress from Pauline's anymore, but there are stories contained within those weathered walls, and your camera allows us to ponder them. Job well done!

  1. dalecooper57 said...:

    Great photos Ron. And you're right about people too. Take, oh, I don't know, picking someone at random, Audrey Hepburn; even if you'd never seen a youthful picture of her, you'd still be able to see her luminous beauty in later photos. Nice post. Have a groovy weekend.

  1. Ron said...:

    Howdy Mark!

    "Maybe nobody buys a wedding dress from Pauline's anymore, but there are stories contained within those weathered walls..."

    You said it, buddy! And you can just FEEL that, can't you?

    The STORIES. I walk by that building quite often and think that.

    Much thanks for stopping by, Mark. Have an awesome holiday weekend!

    X to you and Tara!

  1. Ron said...:

    " Take, oh, I don't know, picking someone at random, Audrey Hepburn; even if you'd never seen a youthful picture of her, you'd still be able to see her luminous beauty in later photos."


    Dale, you are sooooooo right! And thank you so much for sharing that because it's a PERFECT example of what I mean with this post. Even in later photos, and even when she was ill, you could STILL see the beauty emanating from her.


    Much thanks for stopping by, buddy. Have a GROOVY weekend as well!


    X

  1. Matt said...:

    Ron, these pictures rock, as well as your analogy to urban decay, aging, and seeing the beauty within them. I for one have always held our elderly in high regard and in much respect. I have also always preferred older architecture to new. Like you said, there is a reverence within them - a history and a story. And if we look and listen, we can see and hear it.


    Beautiful post, dude!

  1. babs (beetle) said...:

    That is how the UK was, when I was growing up. You would get young boys helping the elderly across the street. You never sat down and let anyone over a certain age stand! Those values have completely disappeared now. So sad.

  1. Ron said...:

    Yes, Babs, as well as when I was growing up. My mother was HUGE about teaching us to respect our elders. In fact, she smoked, but knew that her mother didn't approve of it. So she would NEVER smoke around her mother - even when she got older.

    "Those values have completely disappeared now. So sad."

    You said it.

    X

  1. Geraldine said...:

    what a wonderful post Ron and so true, there is beauty in that decay if we only look beneath the surface. I've seen some beautiful buildings going down over the years, imploded, trashed...all in the name of "progress" making room for a modern "box" to take it's place. Efficient but sad and boring at the same time.
    LOVE every photo, especially the lady at the food court.
    Have a super weekend, G
    www.mypoeticpath.wordpress.com

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey there Matt!

    Thank you :)

    " Like you said, there is a reverence within them - a history and a story. And if we look and listen, we can see and hear it."



    LOVE how you said that!!!


    And yes, I too preferred older architecture to new. The building I live in dates back to the '30's and still has all the old hardwood floors, molding and glass door knobs. LOVE them!


    Thanks for stopping by, buddy. Have a super holiday weekend!


    X

  1. Ron said...:

    Hellooooooooo Geraldine!

    " I've seen some beautiful buildings going down over the years, imploded, trashed...all in the name of "progress" making room for a modern "box" to take it's place. Efficient but sad and boring at the same time."



    Exactly....a modern "box" to take it's place! Philadelphia does an excellent job in keeping and restoring most of our older, historical buildings. But it takes money, so sometimes the buildings sit for years until they get the funding. But it's funny, I can still see the beauty within the decay.


    Yes, isn't the lady in the food court faaabuous? OMG..I smiled so BIG when I spotted her. She was so colorful and bright. You GO, girl!


    Have a super holiday weekend, dear lady. And thank you so much for stopping by!


    X

  1. Robert said...:

    Ron, I love when you share these deep, thought-provoking posts. I enjoy reading how you look at things in a certain perspective, which causes me to see them differently. These photos are so beautiful. I took my time looking at them and could really see the beauty in them. The seventh photo down, although decaying, you can see the beautiful architecture still present, peeking through.


    And I love that last photo of the elderly lady sitting in the food court because regardless of her age, she really is beautiful and colorful! I would rather be with our elderly than people my own age because they have the wisdom and knowledge we don't yet have.


    Have a safe and happy holiday weekend, Ron!

  1. Chrissy Starr said...:

    OMG, we are SO the same person! I asked my sister if she would drive with me through East Cleveland, which is total ghetto, but which used to be so grand. I wanted to photograph it!
    My father taught me to find the beauty. I remember one time we were driving out in the country and I passed by an old barn that was falling apart. I slowed down and he looked at me and nodded his head. We turned around and he took a photo (cuz he always had a camera with him). He ended up painting it from the photo. My mother, in the meantime, was in the backseat yelling because we were taking a picture of a crappy old barn.
    Love these photos! And the sweet old lady, too.

    Have a great weekend!

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey ho Robert!

    Thanks buddy :)

    "The seventh photo down, although decaying, you can see the beautiful architecture still present, peeking through.Z"

    Funny you mentioned that one because it was actually the last photo I took for this series. I spotted that building down in Old City one day and I had to snap a photo of it. It sits between two newer buildings, so it really sticks out. But I thought it was beautiful!

    Isn't the lady in food court adorable? I wanted to HUG her. Love the hat and the striped socks!

    "I would rather be with our elderly than people my own age because they have the wisdom and knowledge we don't yet have."

    I felt the same way when I was much younger, but still feel the same way now - wisdom and knowledge.

    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy. Wishing you a safe and happy holiday weekend as well!

    Cheers!
    X

  1. Ron said...:

    "OMG, we are SO the same person!"

    HA! And why am I not surprised? We both love black jelly beans too!

    Yes, we have quite a few areas like that in Philly (such as Germantown) which at one time was exquisite, but eventually turned into what looks like war zone. But the homes are still HUGE and GRAND, that you can still see the beauty.

    "My father taught me to find the beauty......we turned around and he took a photo (cuz he always had a camera with him). He ended up painting it from the photo."

    OMG...I LOVE that story, Chrissy!!!



    Yes, isn't the elderly lady so SWEET? I saw her and wanted to run down and hug her. I took that shot from the upper level of the food court.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, girl. Have a GREAT holiday weekend!


    X to you and the gang!

  1. Debbie said...:

    This is lovely, Ron. I'd never really thought to compare urban decay to old age, but you're right. Every stage in life is beautiful -- it's just how we view things that might not be so!
    Part of me really wanted to fix up those old buildings (if nothing else, for safety's sake!), but just because they're showing signs of age doesn't mean they're not still useful.
    Well said, my observant friend! Thank you for pointing out another perspective.

    Have a super weekend!

  1. Ron said...:

    Hellooooo there Debbie!

    " Every stage in life is beautiful -- it's just how we view things that might not be so!"

    You're spot on about that. Every stage of like is beautiful - it's just how we look at it. All my life though, I've always seen age as something incredibly beautiful. I remember telling my mother that I couldn't wait to get older and she laughed because I was only 14 years old at the time - HA!

    "Part of me really wanted to fix up those old buildings (if nothing else, for safety's sake!),"

    Yes, I know, some of these look REALLY rundown, almost as if they're going to FALL down. But no one is permitted to go inside them until they are restored. The thing I really love about Philly is that when they eventually restore an old building, they keep everything on the outside the same (to preserve the look), but redo inside.

    Thanks so much for stopping by, dear lady. Wishing you a beautiful holiday weekend!

    Cheers!
    X

  1. Timmy said...:

    Great pictures Ronaldo

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey Tom!!!!

    Thank you. And thanks for stopping by, bro!

    Have a GREAT weekend! And say hello to Cozzy for me!

    X

  1. Mary said...:

    Not sure how much I like urban decay, but shabby chic is pretty cool. ;)
    I get what you're saying though and do like your comparison and how you see the beauty there.
    Good photos! I like the second one, the one with the black windows and the one of the older woman. Cool socks she's rockin' there.


    Hope you're enjoying a great weekend. xo

  1. Ron said...:

    Hey there Mary!

    Thank you :) I took these photos over a period of about a month and a half and I thought I would post them simply as, urban decay. But then I suddenly got inspired to make the comparison.

    "the one of the older woman. Cool socks she's rockin' there."

    Yes, isn't she a adorable? The socks reminded me of Dr. Seuss!

    Thanks for stopping by, neighbor. Have a FABULOUS holiday weekend!

    X

  1. Robert said...:

    Ron, my favorite thing to do is to come back and read everyone's comment. It's so interesting to read what people say and how they feel. You have such great readers here who take the time to share in depth comments.

  1. Ron said...:

    "You have such great readers here who take the time to share in depth comments."

    Yes, I know, and I so appreciate that because discussion through comments is the BEST part of sharing a post. And thank you, buddy, for taking part!

    Hope you're having an awesome weekend and thanks for stopping back!

  1. Oh Ron you have NO idea... I think photography like this is the MOST beautiful. You are so amazingly talented, for one. THIS should be your career... photography!


    When I go on my hikes in the woods and come across old farm equipment... doll heads... any of that, I have to take a picture of it. I go for old decayed items over plants any day.


    My good friend does urban exploring... sneaks in to old decayed buildings and takes AMAZING shots. One day I plan to blog about it and show his pictures... you will LOVE them.


    In the meantime... yours are ASTOUNDING.... I have no words!

  1. Ron said...:

    Katherine, you're such a sweetheart. Thank you for your supportive and encouraging words :)

    And I have to say to YOU...you're photography ROCKS, girl! And I so look forward to seeing what you come up with for photo challenge you're entering this month!

    "When I go on my hikes in the woods and come across old farm equipment... doll heads... any of that, I have to take a picture of it. I go for old decayed items over plants any day."

    OMG, you TOO? You find beauty in decay as well?

    Isn't there something intriguing and alluring about it? Decay has such HISTORY in it.

    "One day I plan to blog about it and show his pictures... you will LOVE them."

    Yahooo...I can't wait to see them!

    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Hope you're enjoy the holiday weekend!

    X

  1. Mel said...:

    Thank you. You put into words something I've struggled to put my finger on. It's disturbed me since I returned home and I thought it was just me being edgy.
    It's hard to see someone/something devalued because of a narrow perception or....ignorance/ lack of information.

    We, --I conclude things and act on that conclusion. Sometimes in a very unloving way...
    I didn't have that reaction with the gorgeous buildings and architecture. Note the windows... Absolutely adored the photos, loved the bits worn and forever changed. Amazing. I could stand and wander the alley ways, never tiring of the affects of the aging.
    But the last photo carried the simple message that has haunted me all weekend. Aloneness takes center stage. And it's not solitude, it's aloneness. That's the bittersweet of humanness. I wonder if buildings get that same sense. I get that tug at my heart when I see emptiness, but I don't feel the aloneness.
    We need to do so much more WITH each other.
    Saddens me. We renovate buildings and destroy people.....

  1. Ron said...:

    Mel, I so loved your comment because your truly understood the deep, deep message that I was conveying in this post, and THEN some.

    "It's hard to see someone/something devalued because of a narrow perception or....ignorance/ lack of information."

    Exactly.

    Perspective.

    You can look at these photos in so many different ways - as decay, emptiness, aloneness, or all of the above. And yes, it/they mirror the bittersweetness of humanness.

    I didn't see that last photo as being aloneness, but I can see how anyone could. I saw it/her as a BRIGHT spot in the food court. Even how the LIGHT from the skylight above ILLUMINATES her, I felt as though it was saying to me...."Look at how beautiful and colorful she is!"

    "We need to do so much more WITH each other."

    Yes, we do need to do so much more with each other, I agree.

    And it's as you shared...it has to do with altering our perception.

    Thanks oodles for stopping by and sharing on this post, dear lady. You've added much!

    (((((((( You ))))))))

    X

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