Amy Winehouse In Her Glory


She took from soul, blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll, and 60’s Motown and then made them her own.

You couldn’t really define her because she crossed over into so many different music genres.

Her voice was both strong and powerful, and emotional and fragile.

And for all those things, that's what I loved about her.

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You didn’t have to be a fan of Amy Winehouse, like I was, to understand this post because I’m sure you’ve all known favorite actors, musicians, artists, or even someone in your own life that perhaps struggled with or passed away due to alcohol and/or drug addiction.

Yes, Amy was extremely self-destructive, which I’m sure caused tremendous pain for those who knew and loved her, to have watched this talented young lady destroy her life with addiction.

But even without knowing her in person, beyond all her messy behavior, I could sense that there was also something very sweet and innocent about her because there was a quality in her voice when she sang that exposed ALL of who she was - the dark and the light.

And it was the same with Judy Garland and Billie Holliday, and other great talents. They poured out their heart and soul whenever they performed; openly exposing both their pain and glory.

It seems to be that way with a lot of creative-type people who have exceptional talent, like the recent passing of Philip Seymour Hoffman.

And who really knows why someone does this to themselves, other than they must be in massive pain that drugs and alcohol numb, which turns into an emotional and physical addiction.

I think it’s very easy to say, “Well…I don’t feel sorry for them because they knew what they were doing, so they had it coming.”

I can’t tell you how many cruel and nasty comments I read over at You Tube this week, while watching several documentaries on the life of Amy Winehouse.

Just because someone took drugs and was an alcoholic doesn’t mean they were a horrible person.

Yes, I suppose people who abuse alcohol or drugs must know what they are doing on a logical level, however, I also believe there has to be an underlining subconscious reason for why they continue to do it, which logic no longer has meaning.

They say that people have to hit rock bottom before they get help. And Amy did hit rock bottom and got help, yet unfortunately succumbed.

And that has been the case with many.

I don’t feel sorry for these people. I feel empathy.

It’s easy to presume that because someone was famous, wealthy, and seemed to have had it all, that their drug taking or alcoholism was unforgivable because they were given such a great opportunity and were more fortunate than most people.

But apparently they didn’t have it all did they?

I’m not trying to make excuses for Amy Winehouse or anyone who struggled with addiction and died. But what I am saying is that we don’t really know what someone was going through in their lives or what inner demons they were wrestling with.

I choose to look back on the life of Amy Winehouse and focus on her talent and what she left behind in spite of her demons and addictions.

Not long before Amy passed away, she performed a duet (Body and Soul) with Tony Bennett who had this to say about her:

“She was an extraordinary musician with a rare intuition as a vocalist and I am truly devastated that her exceptional talent has come to such an early end. She was a lovely and intelligent person and when we recorded together she gave a soulful and extraordinary performance."

I choose to remember Amy Winehouse in her glory...


Have wonderful weekend everyone!
X

Body and Soul

54 comments

  1. It seems as though many artists, in any field, seem to suffer emotionally and mentally. I'm sure that someday science will discover something in the brain that connects it all.

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  2. Ron, I agree that Amy was a remarkable singer and I often wished the attempts to cure her addiction had worked. Maybe if she'd had the right people, other than her family, around her she might have had better support. It was all very, very sad, and I can only hope her spirit is now at peace.


    Wishing you a very peaceful weekend x

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  3. I have a theory.

    What makes a really exceptional artist? A person whose emotions have been brought out to the surface. Not shielded by protective walls, as most of us are. That's how they perform so well and that's how they live. Unfortunately, it is very hard to live with all of your raw emotions out there, for life and people to damage. Most people (if not all) who live like that, have had their lives cut short, by alcohol or drugs of some sort. It seems it's the price you pay for that really exceptional talent.

    Of course, there will always be the artists who simply choose the drink/drugs route, but they're not who I'm referring to.

    I loved Amy Winehouse, Judy Garland and Liza Minelli. I thought Liza would go the way her mother did but, thankfully, she managed to struggle through her life and actually stay alive. Possibly because she was no longer performing, as such.

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  4. "I choose to remember Amy Winehouse in her glory..."


    Beautifully and simply stated, Ron. It is so painful to see such talented, gifted people like Amy Winehouse and Phillip Seymour Hoffman destroy themselves with these terrible addictions.


    I read some particularly heartless comments about Hoffman by people i consider my friends and I just couldn't believe my eyes. Do you think these people want to end up dead on slab at the prime of their lives? Addiction is a curse, a nightmare, and it can happen to anybody.


    Great frame brings great pressure and while I'm certainly not defending drug abuse, mocking and condemning these lost souls is not the proper response. It just drives them deeper into despair.


    Thanks for sharing this one, buddy. It's certainly given me a lot to think about. Take care and have a great weekend!

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  5. Gooooood morning Valerie!

    "Maybe if she'd had the right people, other than her family, around her she might have had better support."

    From what I've read and watched on various documentaries, Amy did get outside support and was doing very well for about 18 months. However, she went back to alcohol, which was what caused her death.

    " It was all very, very sad, and I can only hope her spirit is now at peace."



    Yes, it was very sad. Very. She said in one of her interviews (which was almost like a premonition) that her only wish was to touch people's lives with one successful album, and that if she we're to die after that, she would be happy.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, dear lady. Have a lovely weekend!


    X to you and Joe!

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  6. I believe drug addiction and alcoholism are equal opportunity destroyers. I agree with Rob that great success brings with it inordinate pressure. And somewhere in the middle of the mess, a soul can get lost if there isn't a strong support system in place to help combat the demons. Whatever the reason, it's sad when such talent is taken prematurely.

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  7. Babs, I LOVE what you shared here because you expressed something that I didn't in this post, but feel exactly the same way...

    "A person whose emotions have been brought out to the surface. Not shielded by protective walls, as most of us are. That's how they perform so well and that's how they live. Unfortunately, it is very hard to live with all of your raw emotions out there, for life and people to damage."

    You are so spot on about that! And you're right, most people (if not all) have had their lives cut short, by addiction of some sort.

    "I thought Liza would go the way her mother did but, thankfully, she managed to struggle through her life and actually stay alive. Possibly because she was no longer performing, as such."



    Yes, Liza started to go down the same path as her mother, but managed to struggle through her life and survive. And like her mother, is sooooo talented!


    Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your thoughts on this post, my friend. Have a lovely weekend!


    X to you and Mo!

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  8. "I’m not trying to make excuses for Amy Winehouse or anyone who struggled with addiction and died. But what I am saying is that we don’t really know what someone was going through in their lives or what inner demons they were wrestling with."

    Addiction is NO JOKE. It's a real disease that's cunning, baffling, and most of all powerful.

    Philip Seymour Hoffman was sober for 20 + years before his relapse and subsequent passing. My whole heart goes out to those who've suffered from addiction and their families.

    And Amy Winehouse was and will always be INCREDIBLE in my eyes!

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  9. What a lovely tribute, Ron! I believe your statement, "we don’t really know what someone was going through in their lives or what inner demons they were wrestling with," states very well the crux of the matter.

    While it's easy to look at someone famous and rue their choices, none of us always makes the "right" choices, do we? We make decisions based on the info at hand -- and none of us has a crystal ball.

    Poor Amy. On the surface, it would appear she had it all (or at least, had the possibility of having it all). But dig a little deeper, and we find a troubled soul who unwisely chose to numb her pain in a destructive manner. I always find it sad when talent burns itself out too soon.

    Have a splendid weekend, dear!

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  10. Hey there Rob!

    "It is so painful to see such talented, gifted people like Amy Winehouse and Phillip Seymour Hoffman destroy themselves with these terrible addictions."

    Yes, it is. And I was so utterly devastated to read about Hoffman several weeks ago because he was such an amazing talent, who I had seen in a movie prior to reading about his death, that it just floored me.

    "I read some particularly heartless comments about Hoffman by people i consider my friends and I just couldn't believe my eyes."

    Yes, me as well. In fact, several people I know said, "Well, don't expect me to feel sorry for him because he knew what he was doing!"

    "Great frame brings great pressure and while I'm certainly not defending drug abuse, mocking and condemning these lost souls is not the proper response. It just drives them deeper into despair."

    Exactly. And as I shared, I'm not trying to make excuses for these people, but we don't ever know what someone was going through and that fame is not all what it's cracked up to be.



    MUCH thanks for stopping by and sharing on this post, buddy. Have grrrrrrrrrreat weekend!

    X

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  11. This is beautiful Ronnie! I had a hate/ love relationship with her music but I can definitely relate to the sentiment you shared. It is so sad to see how nasty people can be when people die of drugs or alcohol. It seems people are so quick to dismiss this type of addiction but the fact is it is just that an addiction. I feel you really can't understand what someone goes through until you walk a mile in their shoes. I love that you choose to remember her for all the joy she brought rather than dwelling on the painful end.

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  12. Hola Denise!

    " But it wasn't until after she passed away did I really take notice of her amazing talent. I had heard a few songs of hers and liked them, but never realize to the extent of her vocal range and genres."

    Ironic you mentioned that because I was the same way. I never TRULY appreciated her talent until after she passed away. I liked many of her songs from hearing them on the radio, but then after going back and listening to both her albums, I thought, "Wow...she was so freaking talented!"

    "she sounded like Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Billie Holliday."



    I agree, and especially Billie Holiday! Amy had a soulfulness in her voice.


    Thank so much for stopping by girl. And I'm glad to hear you enjoyed the video clip. Isn't it beautiful? I've already listened to it like 100 times already.


    Have a super weekend!
    X

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  13. Hey there Lisa!

    "I believe drug addiction and alcoholism are equal opportunity destroyers."

    Yes, you're so right!

    And you're also so right about this...

    "...that great success brings with it inordinate pressure. And somewhere in the middle of the mess, a soul can get lost if there isn't a strong support system in place to help combat the demons."



    Yes.


    Much thanks for stopping by and sharing on this post, my friend. Have a fantastic weekend!


    X

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  14. "Addiction is NO JOKE. It's a real disease that's cunning, baffling, and most of all powerful."

    Yes, Meleah....you are so RIGHT about that...NO JOKE. And it is cunning and oh-so very powerful.

    "Philip Seymour Hoffman was sober for 20 + years before his relapse and subsequent passing. My whole heart goes out to those who've suffered from addiction and their families."

    Amen.

    I remember walking down the street a few weeks ago, as my eyes caught sight of a magazine on a news stand that had a picture of Hoffman on the cover, which said he had died. I was FLOORED.

    "And Amy Winehouse was and will always be INCREDIBLE in my eyes!"



    Me too! Meeeeee too!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, girl. Have a fanatabulous weekend!


    X

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  15. Hey there Debbie!

    I LOVED what you shared here...

    "While it's easy to look at someone famous and rue their choices, none of us always makes the "right" choices, do we? We make decisions based on the info at hand -- and none of us has a crystal ball."

    That is sooooooooooooo true! None of us has a crystal ball and we make decisions based on the info at hand.

    " I always find it sad when talent burns itself out too soon."



    I do too. And Amy, in my eyes, had a very special talent. She was one-of-a-kind.


    Much thanks for stopping by, dear lady. Have a splendid weekend as well!


    X

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  16. Hey there Shae!

    " I had a hate/ love relationship with her music."

    Yes, I know other people who felt the same way, so I do understand. Her music and voice were so "one-of-a-kind" that people either seemed to enjoy it or didn't, or felt middle of the road.

    "It seems people are so quick to dismiss this type of addiction but the fact is it is just that an addiction. I feel you really can't understand what someone goes through until you walk a mile in their shoes."



    Well said, Shae!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, girl. Have a wonderful weekend!


    X

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  17. Ron, I don't think the majority of people understood and appreciated the talent of Amy Winehouse. They saw her mainly as an addict who was a total mess because of the media and tabloids. Yet in my opinion, she was a musical genius because she started writing music when she was only a teenager. And the quality of her voice was of someone 3x's her age. One of my favorite songs of hers was Back To Black.

    Thank you for posting this, dude. Amy Winehouse ROCKED!

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  18. Mark PetruskaFebruary 28, 2014

    I had a personal "dalliance" with vicodin once, years ago. It's not something I share often, but in the year my life fell apart and my ex and I got divorced, I had friends who turned me on to the drug as a way to help ease the pain I was going through. Before long we were pooling our money and buying 90 pills at a time to split three ways. None of this was legal or moral, and it's not something I'm proud of, but in those dark days it helped me feel better. At one point I was up to 8 pills a day and beginning my slide down a very slippery slope. Fortunately - I say that now, but at the time I was devastated - we were caught, and lost access to the meds. Thank god, because I was a borderline addict after a couple of months. Once they were gone, I found myself craving those pills like mad. The truth is, I still do, to this day. But I do not indulge, because I know firsthand how easily it is for addiction to take grip of your life. I'm convinced if we hadn't gotten caught, I might be dead now. Because of this, I refuse to judge the Amy Winehouses and Phillip Seymour Hoffmans of the world.

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  19. It is such beauty to experience the artistic talents of those who pour their hearts and souls into their work. It is sad to see the demise of some of these same truly talented people.

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  20. Mark, I cannot thank you enough for sharing your honesty in this post. Truly, I thank you.

    "The truth is, I still do, to this day. But I do not indulge, because I know firsthand how easily it is for addiction to take grip of your life."

    Good for you, buddy, and I applaud you for that!

    And yes, I have heard from several people how addictive Vicodin can be and how quickly it can happen. And I heard it's the same with Xanax.

    " Because of this, I refuse to judge the Amy Winehouses and Phillip Seymour Hoffmans of the world."



    Amen! I don't think many of us can truly grasp addiction, like someone who has been there and experienced it in some degree.


    Again, I thank you for sharing on this post because you've added MUCH!


    Have faaaaaaaaaaaabulous weekend, Mark!


    X to you and Tara!

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  21. Hiya Matt!

    "Yet in my opinion, she was a musical genius because she started writing music when she was only a teenager. And the quality of her voice was of someone 3x's her age."


    Yes, I felt the same way about her as well. I read somewhere that she was composing music at 14 years old. AMAZING! And you're so right, her voice DID sound like someone 3x's her age.


    Loved Back to Black too!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy. Have a most excellent weekend!
    X

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  22. You're right, Suzi...

    "It is such beauty to experience the artistic talents of those who pour their hearts and souls into their work. And it's sad to see the demise of some of these same people truly talented people.



    It's almost like their artistry was a double-edged sword.


    Thank you for stopping by, my friend. Have a great weekend!


    X

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  23. Since I suffer from chronic depression, I can tell you with certainty people don't think when they are depressed. They are so overwhelmed by their feelings, often of worthlessness, they don't really think in a logical fashion. You are in so much pain, you only want the pain to stop, no matter what you have to do (including killing yourself)! Numbing the pain with drugs or alcohol (or both) is not that unreasonable.

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  24. " They are so overwhelmed by their feelings, often of worthlessness,they don't really think in a logical fashion. You are in so much pain, you only want the pain to stop, no matter what you have to do (including killing yourself)! Numbing the pain with drugs or alcohol (or both) is not that unreasonable."

    Benze, thank you for sharing that because even though I have never suffered from depression, I still somehow know that what said is the absolute truth. You will do anything to stop the pain. And logic has no meaning, you just want to stop the pain.

    Again, thank you SO MUCH for sharing on this post, my friend.

    (((((((( You ))))))))

    X ya!

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  25. Ron, thank you for sharing this post topic because I think it's something that needed to be said. I don't think anyone can really comprehend what it must be like for someone to be in that much inner pain, regardless of how successful they may be appear on the outside. And in the case of someone like Judy Garland, she was given those drugs as a child by the industry, so they were cause of her addiction to begin with.


    I've know a few people who were addicted to drugs and it was very difficult to watch because you would do anything in your power to help, but can't. And you're right, just because some takes drugs doesn't mean they are a horrible person. Fortunately, those few that I have known got help and were able to turn their lives and get off the drugs. Some however, are not so fortunate.


    Amy Winehouse was such an incredible talent, I agree!

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  26. Hey ho Robert!

    " And in the case of someone like Judy Garland, she was given those drugs as a child by the industry, so they were cause of her addiction to begin with."

    Yes, exactly! So she didn't even have a choice with her addiction because it was something administered to her at a very young age BY the studios. They basically used and abused her for their own benefit and then tossed her aside when she had problems with her addiction, which THEY the cause.

    "Fortunately, those few that I have known got help and were able to turn their lives and get off the drugs."

    Glad to hear that, Robert! :)

    Thanks a bunch for stopping by and sharing on this post, buddy. Have a terrific weekend!

    X

    P.S. Wasn't Amy Winehouse INCREDIBLE?

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  27. I resisted Amy Winehouse for a long time, but I've always been slow to catch on to great things. I can't tell you how many times I've listened to the song "Back to Black" - to me, it tells us everything we need to know of why she returned to those things that eventually destroyed her. I was surprised by Hoffman's passing, but there is, I think, a deep sadness and loneliness to the human condition that many people simply cannot transcend, and though it should be obvious that material success will not help them transcend it, it feels so much that it should. Because we all want to do better, I think - I am struggling with a difficult financial situation now, but I honestly think it will get better in time - but even if it does, I want to always remember that things will never take the place of something that is lacking inside. What happened to Amy Winehouse was, ultimately, just a tragedy, even if it was to some degree a self-inflicted one - but I hope that others who hear her music will hear someone who was able to transcend her pain not through drugs, in the end - but through the music itself. It is just a shame that the music cannot last.

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  28. I see no more sense in judging those who forfeit their lives to addictions than those who have any other mental health issue. It's sad, it's a waste, but no one sets out to be an addict. People self-medicate for a wide variety of reasons, but almost always to distance themselves from some hurt or emptiness.

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  29. I'm not really a fan, but I've no doubt she was a nice enough person, my problem is with the post mortem canonization of celebrities who die as a result of drug and alcohol "abuse" on the grounds that they must have all been tortured souls.
    Sometimes you just have to accept that, like it or not, drugs are enjoyed by a very large number of people simply because the effects of them are extremely pleasant.
    If some folks overdo it because they get carried away with the amount of money they have at their disposal, it doesn't mean they're necessarily trying to numb their pain or block out some terrible trauma, it's just as likely to be lack of caution or simple stupidity.
    That isn't to say I don't think Amy had problems, just that her problems would have been just as traumatic had she been a checkout girl or farmer's daughter, her celebrity status only meant that it became a matter of public record, allowing us all to make value judgements based purely on the mercurial fads of the popular press, not knowing what her reasons were for taking drugs in the first place.

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  30. David OliverMarch 01, 2014

    Ron, I've never listened to Amy but will after reading this. I agree with everything you've said here. We all have to find a place in this world where we find some happiness. It is not a given. For the people who cannot find happiness, I feel, as you said empathy, even pity but never contempt.

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  31. "I see no more sense in judging those who forfeit their lives to addictions than those who have any other mental health issue."

    Exactly! And you're right, no one 'sets out' to be a addict.

    " People self-medicate for a wide variety of reasons, but almost always to distance themselves from some hurt or emptiness."

    Could't agree with you more!

    Much thanks for stopping by, girl! Have a super weekend and I hope all is well with your root canal.

    X

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  32. "We all have to find a place in this world where we find some happiness. It is not a given. For the people who cannot find happiness, I feel, as you said empathy, even pity but never contempt."

    Well said, Nathaniel! Well said!

    To me, Amy was a very gifted vocal artist because her talent was so instinctive and raw. And I loved the tone and quality of voice. There was something very 'earthy' about it.

    If you're interested, here a link one of her You Tube Channels.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch v=nMO5Ko_77Hk&list=RDTJAfLE39ZZ8



    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy! Have a SUPER weekend!


    X

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  33. Hey there Dale!

    "Sometimes you just have to accept that, like it or not, drugs are enjoyed by a very large number of people simply because the effects of them are extremely pleasant. If some folks overdo it because they get carried away with the amount of money they have at their disposal, it doesn't mean they're necessarily trying to numb their pain or block out some terrible trauma, it's just as likely to be lack of caution or simple stupidity."



    True, but there is a reason why someone continues to do this to extent that Amy and others have (and have also gone back to, after being off drugs and alcohol for some time), besides it being just a pleasant experience. I've watched several documentaries on her life, by people (such as her father) who knew her personally. Yes, her drug taking may have started out recreational, but there was something that went waaaaay beyond and much deeper; causing her to continue.


    Much thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts on this post topic, buddy! Have a grrrrreat weekend!


    X

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  34. "I resisted Amy Winehouse for a long time, but I've always been slow to catch on to great things. I can't tell you how many times I've listened to the song "Back to Black" - to me, it tells us everything we need to know of why she returned to those things that eventually destroyed her."

    Yes! You are spot on about that, Nathaniel! I think Back to Black pretty much sums it up. And another song I feel does the same is "Love Is A Losing Game."

    What I loved Amy was that she never hid her pain in her music, but rather exposed it.

    " I was surprised by Hoffman's passing, but there is, I think, a deep sadness and loneliness to the human condition that many people simply cannot transcend, and though it should be obvious that material success will not help them transcend it, it feels so much that it should."

    I was equally surprised by Hoffman's passing. In fact, I was shocked! And what you shared here is so true...it's obvious that material success and fame will not help them transcend it.

    "I am struggling with a difficult financial situation now, but I honestly think it will get better in time - but even if it does, I want to always remember that things will never take the place of something that is lacking inside."

    WOW! Nathaniel, you never cease to amaze at how you see things from such an insightful perspective. I too went through a period of financial difficulty many years ago, and that's exactly what it taught me...things will never take the place of something that is lacking inside. And it also taught me that in spite of my financial lack, I was still wealthy, which is something I never saw before.

    " but I hope that others who hear her music will hear someone who was able to transcend her pain not through drugs, in the end - but through the music itself."



    Amen!


    Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and feelings on this post, buddy. Thank you!


    Enjoy your weekend!


    X

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  35. Ron, this morning I watched the clip you put on your sidebar because yesterday I didn't have the time. Beautiful!

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  36. Hiya Matt! Glad you enjoyed it, buddy! Tony Bennett has a channel over at You Tube in which he sings with several different vocal artists. If you click on the Tony and Amy link, it should take you to the channel. It's AWESOME!

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  37. not a fan of amy or her music and while it "seems" like celebrities have it all, i agree they don't. it's sad when someone cuts their life short by whatever means. we never know what darkness they are dealing with or going through. like you said: I don’t feel sorry for these people. I feel empathy. sadly, they paid a high price.

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  38. Hey there Val!

    "we never know what darkness they are dealing with or going through. like you said: I don’t feel sorry for these people. I feel empathy. sadly, they paid a high price."

    Couldn't have said it any better, girl!

    I watched a video clip in which Tony Bennett spoke of a time after Amy died, when he met Amy's mother and they sat down to talk. He said that she said that everyone feels regretful about my daughter. But I knew what she really wanted to do and what her dream was and she did it. And even though she had a short life, she accomplished what she wanted to do. And that's what I focus on.

    Thanks so much for stopping by, Val. Have a great rest of your weekend!

    X

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  39. Ron, I didn't follow Amy Winehouse, so probably wouldn't know her music if it slapped me in the face. ;) However, I don't have to know her or her music to see she was a tortured soul.


    So many people are. It's just the "famous" ones are announced in the news and all over the internet. These people, like Amy, are exactly like every other human abusing drugs and alcohol except they are in the spotlight.


    I do believe these tortured souls know it's destructive but I don't think they know how to stop it. They are in pain and the only way to stop it is to self-medicate. That begins the out of control spiral that sometimes claims their lives.


    I too feel sympathy and empathy for these people and anyone else suffering so. I've been down that dark hole myself and while I didn't succumb to drugs and alcohol, I did fantasize about relief. I have my sons to thank. I found courage somewhere inside of myself for them. Not everyone can do that, which is even more sad.


    I try very hard not to judge people. It's the knee-jerk reaction of most humans and it's unfair because we have no clue what someone's private life is like.


    My wish is for anyone tortured or in mental pain to find relief and happiness.


    Thank you for this post. I think it helps to talk about these topics because we probably all know someone who has struggles. And while we might not be able to save them, maybe we can at least try to understand.


    Be safe and warm from Super Storm Titan! And have a fantabulous week!


    ((HUGS))

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  40. Geraldine H.March 02, 2014

    I'm not familiar with her work but I'm sorry to hear of her passing much too soon. Very sad. So much potential gone to waste. RIP.


    Hugs to you Ron and Happy Weekend, G

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  41. Hello there Geraldine!

    Amy passed away about 2 1/2 years ago (she was only 27 years old). I had heard her songs quite often on the radio, but didn't really become a big fan of her's until after died. People seemed to either really like her music or not like it, or were middle of road. I loved her voice because it was very raw and earthy, and she could sing so MANY different genres. To me, she was extremely talented.

    Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend! Hope you're weekend was AWESOME!

    X

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  42. Hellooooo there Pam!

    "However, I don't have to know her or her music to see she was a tortured soul."

    Yes, and you could hear her pain in her music, which is what also gave her music such tenderness and beauty because she never hid her pain, she sang about it openly.

    " It's just the "famous" ones are announced in the news and all over the internet. These people, like Amy, are exactly like every other human abusing drugs and alcohol except they are in the spotlight."

    Exactly! And a lot of the stuff that was written about her in the tabloids (from what her father said) was so magnified and contorted. Granted, she didn't hide her addictions so it was obvious, but I don't think a lot of the 'good stuff' she did (like the work she did for certain charities for children) were acknowledged either. It was only her addictions they focused on.

    "I've been down that dark hole myself and while I didn't succumb to drugs and alcohol, I did fantasize about relief. I have my sons to thank. I found courage somewhere inside of myself for them."

    Thank you so much for sharing that and being so honest. And I'm so glad you found the courage to turn it around.

    ((((((( You )))))))

    " It's the knee-jerk reaction of most humans and it's unfair because we have no clue what someone's private life is like."

    Yes, which is my point, we never really know what's going on in the private lives of others.

    "And while we might not be able to save them, maybe we can at least try to understand."

    Thank you, yes!

    MUCH thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and feelings on this post topic, my friend. You've added MUCH!

    Have a fantabulous week!

    ((((( hugs ))))))

    X

    P.S. Yes, you be safe too! I hear tonight and tomorrow is when we're getting the worst of it.

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  43. Herman TurnipMarch 02, 2014

    Ya know, I was never a big Winehouse fan, but seeing someone spiral out of control in real time was almost too much to bear. She had a great voice, which I really didn't appreciate until I heard her album Back To Black: B-Sides, and specifically her cover of Valerie (really, she knocked it out of the park with this tune). And now I wonder what she could have done in the future if it wasn't for the drugs and alcohol. 'Tis a shame, really.

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  44. Thanks Ron, I'll look for it some time this week!

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  45. Hey there Herman!

    " but seeing someone spiral out of control in real time was almost too much to bear."

    I agree, and it seemed to happen SO fast, didn't it?

    "which I really didn't appreciate until I heard her album Back To Black: B-Sides, and specifically her cover of Valerie (really, she knocked it out of the park with this tune)."

    You said it, that was an AWESOME tune! What I most loved about her voice was the rawness in which she sang. She could really bring out the heart of a song!

    "And now I wonder what she could have done in the future if it wasn't for the drugs and alcohol.'



    I've thought that same thing myself.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy. Hope you're weekend was super!


    X to you, Karin, and Mr. Tyler!

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  46. I love love love her song Rehab. I put it on my very first tiny ipod and played it over and over. Such a GREAT song. I actually heard it on the radio a while back and CRANKED it... belting it out as i drove.

    Nooo noooo NO!

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  47. Wonderful voice, that one.....

    Ya know....every day people die because of addictions. Every day... Every day there's someone found dead with a needle in their arm, every day someone mixes too much booze and pills, every day someone drinks themselves into death. Every day.
    I think I can safely say that's no surprise to you or to the world. We all know it happens, we all are saddened by it, but it sort of melts into the background of our lives until the front page captures some prominent person who dies to the disease.
    Everyone is someone's son/daughter. And every day countless people die because of this disease.


    Yes, I'm saddened by the loss of another son/daughter. I'm saddened that we (seemingly) bury more people from the disease than we see obtain long term sobriety. And, selfishly, I say to you that Hoffman's death will keep me clean and sober another day. We can get complacent and cocky after years of being clean and sober--and when we do there's an open window for that disease to slip into and grab us by the neck.....cuz there's no 'cure' for me and others like me--it's a daily reprieve that's contingent on what I *do* to keep me on the 'right path'.


    Talented gal, this one. So was the gal we buried a couple of years ago--wonderfully passionate artist and the mother of two. Try as they might, the folks who cared about her weren't able to save her from the disease. I'm sure both families knows how difficult it is to live with the end results.
    It's not a pretty disease--

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  48. "Wonderful voice, that one....."

    I sooooooooo agree, Mel! WONDERFUL voice!

    And, selfishly, I say to you that Hoffman's death will keep me clean and sober another day. We can get complacent and cocky after years of being clean and sober--and when we do there's an open window for that disease to slip into and grab us by the neck.....cuz there's no 'cure' for me and others like me--it's a daily reprieve that's contingent on what I *do* to keep me on the 'right path'."



    Beautifully said and good for you!


    ((((((((((( You ))))))))))


    And yes, I've know others who have said the same thing - it's so easy to slip back, so it's something you have to constantly be aware of to stay on the right path.


    I can't tell you how devastated I felt after reading about Hoffman. In fact, I had watched him in a movie only a few days before I read about his death. He was SUCH a talented actor!


    Thank you for sharing on this post topic, dear lady. You've added MUCH.


    ((((((((((((((( You ))))))))))))))))


    Have a super week!


    X ya!

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  49. "It seems as though many artists, in any field, seem to suffer emotionally and mentally."


    You are so right, Bijoux! It seems as though their talents bring them their greatest successes, but at the same time, their greatest struggles. Like a double-edged sword.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend. Have an awesome weekend!


    X

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  50. Ron, I loved Amy Winehouse too. But it wasn't until after she passed away did I really take notice of her amazing talent. I had heard a few songs of hers and liked them, but never realize to the extent of her vocal range and genres. In so many of the songs she sang, she sounded like Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Billie Holliday. But then would turn around and sound so 60's Motown.

    It's was such a tragedy how she died so young because she would have had a long career with her talent. Why does it seem that so many incredibly talents actors and vocal artist lose their lives to drug or alcohol addiction? So sad.

    This is such a beautiful post tribute to her, Ron! And you're right, we should remember these talented people for what they contributed to this world while they were alive and in their glory. Loved the video clip!

    Have a wonderful weekend, Ron x

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  51. "I love love love her song Rehab. I put it on my very first tiny ipod and played it over and over. Such a GREAT song."

    I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE that song too, Katherine! In fact, I just watched the video week. My other favorites are Back to Black, Love is a Losing Game, and Valerie!

    To me, she had a very special voice and talent.

    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Have a super week!

    X

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