In Honor Of Black And White Photography


When I was a kid, black and white photographs were the only thing I ever saw because color film wasn't readily available. So everything I viewed, including photographs, TV and movies, were all in black and white.

And back then, it just seemed normal. That is until everything turned color, and then everything in black and white appeared outdated and boring in comparison.

Yet it's funny, because now whenever I look at anything shot in black and white, I think, "OMG...how faaaaaaabulous!"

There is something so simple and clean about black and white film, yet at the same time very emotional and dramatic. With black and white you see more of a contrast between shadow and light. And most of your professional photographers and filmmakers will tell you, it's much more challenging to shoot in black and white than in color.

And one of my all-time favorite landscape photographers (and environmentalist) was Ansel Adams, because he was infamous for his black and white photography. He did shoot in color, but he preferred black and white because he felt that color could often be a distraction. His photographs are truly amazing because they're so raw and powerful. When you look at Ansel Adams photographs, you feel them in your heart because his love and respect for nature shines through.

And no one captured a sky or landscape like he did.

Snake River in Wyoming - Ansel Adams

So today, I would like to share some of my own photographs to honor a time when that's all there really was.

Black & White.

Please enjoy...


Skyscrapers


Window Arches


Icy River Rocks


Clinging Vines


Water And Steel


The Secret Door


Detail In Architecture


The Philadelphia Art Museum In Vintage


Light


Schuylkill River Waterfall


River In The Sky


Have a super Monday everyone!
X


Note: If you're interested, this is a beautiful documentary about the man behind the camera. Ansel Adams: A Documentary Film

Note: Some of these black and white photo prints may be purchased at my Zazzle Store: Caught My Eye

55 comments

  1. I love black & white photographs, they seem so much sharper and more interesting than colour. Your photographs are amazing Ron , I particularly like the secret door. x

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  2. Very cool photos, Ron. My favorite is the door because of the subtle shadows. It gives the photo a suspenseful feel, like you never know what could be behind that door.

    When I ordered my son's senior pictures, I chose to have a few of his formal shots in black and white wallet sized, framed together. It looks fabulous!

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  3. nice photographs ron. i love looking at your work. as good as ansel was, for some reason i'm not a fan of his - not sure why. i like some of his work though. maybe it's my lack of knowledge to appreciate what he did back then - though i know of some of his techniques, i never used them so it's harder for me to appreciate. what he did in the darkroom, we do in photoshop or whatever. i appreciate his images, but he did more than take a pretty picture, he hand burned, dodged and developed his own work on a much larger format than what most use today - i just wish i had a better understanding of all that entails. i love black and white photography though, no matter how it's done. okay off topic. anyhoo, i love the secret door photo, nice lighting and contrast. well done, my friend.

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  4. Excellent photos, Ron!


    I know I've said it before, but you have an excellent eye. Your photos always have so much life to them. And I love black and white photography. The images are so stark and dramatic. I particularly love "the Secret Door."


    There are times when color can overwhelm the image and take the life out of a photo. Black and white images can really tell us a story.


    Thanks for sharing, buddy, and have a great week!

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  5. I am beside myself over these.... I am just floored. First of all, how did you come up with such an amazing idea. And then your pictures... WOW WOW WOW. The best work I have ever seen you do. This is beyond professional work.... This is so AMAZING. You need to be doing this full time after getting published. This is your calling.... Or one of many. Ron I can't even pick out a favorite they are ALL so good!

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  6. Ron, these photographs are so beautiful! And I like how you selected such a wonderful variety because they are all different. My favorites are the secret door, the clinging vines, and the waterfall. I love black and white photographs and films too because they are much more dramatic than color.


    You should be doing this professionally because you have a great eye and talent for photography. And I can tell you love it.


    Have a wonderful week, Ron x

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  7. Nice doorknob Ron.
    I love monochrome, but why has it always been more expensive to develop, I've never understood that?

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  8. Hey there David!

    "I love black and white pictures every bit as much as color. Also I love sepia."

    I agree. And sepia is STUNNING!

    "And I know it is art if I take a second look and maybe third and..."



    Yes, it's definitely an art because I think photography is all in how a photographer SEES (and creates) an image, just like an artist who paints, using the canvas, paints and brushes - it's his interpretation.


    Much thanks for stopping by, buddy. Have an awesome week!


    X

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  9. Gooood morning Valerie!

    Thank you :)

    The shot of the waterfall I took about two weeks ago. It was one that I took using the manual setting on my camera, in an attempt to play with the shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. I'm trying to get away from always using my camera in auto mode, just to have more control. It's been very fun and I'm learning a lot.

    "simply because the lines are sharper and the shades are deeper, as can be seen in the view of Snake River."



    Exactly. And I also think black and white shows more "texture" in a photograph.


    Much thanks for stopping by, dear lady. Have a lovely week!


    X to you and Joe!

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  10. Good morning Pearl!

    "I love black & white photographs, they seem so much sharper and more interesting than colour."



    I agree! I love the contrast in black and white. It's sooooo dramatic!


    Thank you so much for stopping by and for your support and encouraging words, m'dear.


    Have a lovely!
    X

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  11. Hey there Bijoux!

    " It gives the photo a suspenseful feel, like you never know what could be behind that door."

    I took that photograph about month ago. I shot it both in color and in black and white. That door is located in a very old part of Philadelphia.

    "When I ordered my son's senior pictures, I chose to have a few of his formal shots in black and white wallet sized, framed together. It looks fabulous!"



    That AWESOME!!! OMG...when I was in school, they only took our senior pictures in color. But I think black and white is so much more attractive.


    Much thanks for stopping by, my friend. Have a most excellent week!
    X

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  12. Thanks, Val :) You have been such an inspiration for me to try new things, which has made my love for photography grow even more, so thank YOU.

    "as good as ansel was, for some reason i'm not a fan of his - not sure why. i like some of his work though."

    That's okay, we can't all be a fan of the same photographers.

    His work was very raw and almost "unpolished" in a way (especially his earlier stuff) because he was doing photography when so many of the techniques were not even being used or perfected. But I kinda like that about his work because it wasn't necessarily technically 'perfect', it was more about the images and feeling his photographs invoked - his love of nature and landscapes. It's the way he saw things, I think I like the most.

    " what he did in the darkroom, we do in photoshop or whatever. i appreciate his images, but he did more than take a pretty picture, he hand burned, dodged and developed his own work on a much larger format than what most use today."



    Exactly! He did in a darkroom what we do in photoshop today.


    It amazed me (when I watched the documentary) how much TIME he put into developing his photographs.


    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Have a super week!
    X

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  13. Ron, these are breath-taking! I, too, am a big fan of black and white photography, though I rarely choose that option.
    I'm thinking of one e-mail that's been circulating forever, where it talks about the beauty of nature by showing a black-and-white photo, followed by one in glorious color. That's one e-mail worth saving and sharing!
    I love your water droplets on steel, your various architectures, and your nature shots. Beautiful, my friend, simply beautiful!
    Have a super Monday!!

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  14. Hey there Rob!

    Thank you :)

    "And I love black and white photography. The images are so stark and dramatic."

    HA! I knew you would feel the same way because of our mutual love for black and white films!

    "There are times when color can overwhelm the image and take the life out of a photo. Black and white images can really tell us a story."



    Rob, I couldn't have said that any better myself. I sooooo agree!


    Much thanks for stopping by, buddy. Have a super week! Hope you're feeling better!


    X

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  15. Hello there Katherine!


    I came up with this idea last week, after watching the documentary on Ansel Adams. So I decided to write a post about my love and honor for black and white photography.


    Thank you so much for stopping by and for your supportive and encouraging words, my friend. I adore photography, so I just keep messing around and experimenting with things. I LOVE the learning process. And yes, I'm beginning to do more with my photography by getting it out there and seen.


    Have a faaaaaaabulous week, girl!


    X

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  16. Hola Denise!

    Thank you :) I tried to add some variety to these photos, just so they would have a different feel.

    " the clinging vines"

    I took that photograph several weeks ago. It was the front door of a house, down one of those smaller streets in Philly. The thing that attracted me most was the vine growing around the door!

    "I love black and white photographs and films too because they are much more dramatic than color."



    Yup! I agree!


    Thanks so much for stopping by and for your support and encouragement. Yes, I do love photography and keep learning more and more all the time. That's what I enjoy the most....the PROCESS of learning.


    Have a wonderful week, girl!
    X

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  17. Thanks, Dale!

    "I love monochrome, but why has it always been more expensive to develop, I've never understood that?"



    OMG...I know!!! Isn't that strange? Yet you would think that monochrome would be so much more LESS expensive because of the lack of color. I remember when I was still using a film camera and how expensive both the film AND the processing was over color. That's why I love digital!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy. Have an excellent week!
    X

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  18. Hey there Debbie!

    Aw...thank you :)

    " I, too, am a big fan of black and white photography, though I rarely choose that option."

    Me too, and I keep forgetting that I have a black and white option on my camera.

    "I'm thinking of one e-mail that's been circulating forever, where it talks about the beauty of nature by showing a black-and-white photo, followed by one in glorious color. That's one e-mail worth saving and sharing!"



    I've not seen that email but it sounds SO interesting!


    I think color photography is great too, yet there are some things that simply look more dramatic and detailed in black and white. Like a photograph of a Calla Lily. I've seen them shot in color and black and white, and prefer how much more elegant they look in black and white.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, dear lady. Have a faaaaabulous week!


    X

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  19. Wow Ron, these photographs are so impressive! You just keep getting better and better with your camera. It's been such pleasure to watch you grow in photography. And I love how you're not afraid to try new things and experiment.


    Love the water and steel, the icy river rocks, the skyscrapers and that last photo. It looks like a dream. Excellent, dude!


    And I'll check out the documentary sometime this week for sure.

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  20. Hiya Matt!


    Thank you :) For me the best part about photography IS the learning process. I'm trying to get away from always relying on the auto mode, and experimenting with the manual mode. And what I LOVE about digital is that if you don't like how the picture turns out, you can erase it and take another photo!


    In that last photo I used a simple overlay of water to get that effect. I also have that photo without the overlay as well.


    Thanks a bunch for stopping by, buddy, and for your encouragement. Thank you.


    Have a FAN-tabulous week!
    X

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  21. Mark PetruskaFebruary 17, 2014

    I agree, there is something especially dramatic about B&W photographs. Everything seems sharper and in starker contrast, probably because there are no subtle hues to soften the transition between objects. I especially like the first photograph, of the snow-capped mountains and the sun hiding behind the clouds. It would be a beautiful shot in color, I have no doubt, but it seems to contain so much more raw power in B&W. Ol' Ansel knew what he was doing, that's for sure.

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  22. I really do love B & W photos! I actually want to devote a room in my future house to all black and white photography. I think there is something powerful about being able to capture and image with such a muted color palette. I really love your picture of water on metal. It is really captivating. Great post as always Ronnie!

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  23. "It would be a beautiful shot in color, I have no doubt, but it seems to contain so much more raw power in B&W."

    I sooooo agree with you, Mark! Yes, it would be a beautiful shot in color as well. But the image being shot in B&W is what gives it it's POWER. I've only seen a few of Ansels photographs in color, and I have say, they look odd because I'm so used to seeing his work in B&W.

    Much thanks for stopping by, buddy. Have a faaaaabulous week!

    X to you and Tara!

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  24. Hiya Shae!

    "I actually want to devote a room in my future house to all black and white photography."

    OMG....I can't believe you said that because I want to do the same thing!!! But since I live in a studio apartment, I thought I just designate one wall to black and white. Thanks for reminding me about that, Shae!

    "I think there is something powerful about being able to capture and image with such a muted color palette."



    Yup...I agree! Sometimes a void of color actually gives a photo more power.


    Much thanks for stopping by, girl. Have a most EXCELLENT week!


    X

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  25. Stellar shots! Black and white photography strips away everything that isn't essential and makes us focus on what is really important in a shot. Ansel Adams is one of my all-time favorite photographers. You may like some of the ones I'm going to post in the future with the grandbabykins. :-)

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  26. Fabulous! DirtMan recently did a black and white series. I love the depth of black and white.

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  27. What a beautiful set of photos!


    And also, what synchronicity, because I was working on a post that included a bit about an Ansel Adams exhibit I just saw here!

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  28. Hey there Lisa!

    " Black and white photography strips away everything that isn't essential and makes us focus on what is really important in a shot."



    I LOVE the way you said that because it's soooooo true! Excellent observation!


    And don't ya just LOVE Ansel Adams? To me, he had a very special connection to nature. His photographs are spiritual.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend. Looking forward to seeing your photographs of the grandbabykins! You're photograph are ALWAYS so beautiful!


    Have a super week....X

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  29. Hey there Suzi!

    " DirtMan recently did a black and white series."

    OMG...I hope you post them on blog because I would LOVE to see them. Both he and you are so talented with photography!

    " I love the depth of black and white."



    Meeeeeee too!


    Thanks a bunch for stopping by, my friend. Have an excellent week!
    X

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  30. Thanks, girl :) I had so much fun putting this post together.

    "And also, what synchronicity, because I was working on a post that included a bit about an Ansel Adams exhibit I just saw here!"



    *clapping*


    OMG...how ironic! And I can't WAIT to read it! Don't ya just love Ansel Adams? He was so deeply connected to nature that his photographs were spiritual.


    Thanks so much for stopping by and have a fantabulous week!
    X

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  31. Oh, if you saw the walls in the study and the train room....black and whites galore. A part of that is the era, of course. A part of that is the clarity it brings (or doesn't) to the subject. You either compliment the subject with the surroundings, or you lose it in the 'noise'. I like the subject to pop...and that means being choosy, even in color....but especially in B&W. That array of colour changes to shades of gray and blacks, so choosing what's in that B&W frame matters hugely. That's probably why I love some of Ansel's work and frown at others....I love the ones that 'pop'.
    It's also why I'm adoring the ones you took that just 'pop'...the details in architecture, rain and steel, the secret door...the lightbulbs and the river rocks. And the movement in the water that shows in your still...I love the grays in that one. They're all impressive. And that you're trying to capture it through a viewfinder that turns the world to B&W is either a great advantage, or a great disadvantage. Most folks just use the photo program to change an existing colour photo to B&W. I'm not sure how we end up with the B&W is of importance (dunno why it makes a difference to me, but it seems to!)....if the end result makes something in us go 'whoooaaa'....cuz for me it's the movement of 'something in me' that makes for the whole shot.
    I think I'm a reincarnate from the 1930's. LOL. You too, apparently. ;-)

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  32. Hiya Mel!

    " I like the subject to pop...and that means being choosy, even in color....but especially in B&W."

    Yes, and I think that's why I'm especially attracted to B&W because the subject seems to POP! And you're right, Ansel's photographs do that.

    "That array of colour changes to shades of gray and blacks, so choosing what's in that B&W frame matters hugely."

    Exactly! That's why B&W is a bit more challenging, but OH SO awesome!

    "you're trying to capture it through a viewfinder that turns the world to B&W is either a great advantage, or a great disadvantage. Most folks just use the photo program to change an existing colour photo to B&W"

    Yes, I'm trying to use the 'camera' a bit more, instead of doing everything in post-production. I'm fiddling more with the manual settings too, instead of always using it in auto-mode. I still do quite a bit of editing afterwards, but to me that's like a painter using his brushes and paints to fine tune a picture. To me, however a photographer gets the end result is his/her business because it's how he/she SEES the image they took. Like creating a piece of art.

    "I think I'm a reincarnate from the 1930's. LOL. You too, apparently. ;-)"

    HA! Yup...I'm most definitely a reincarnate from the 30's AND 40's. I love that time period!

    Much thanks for stopping by, dear lady. Have a super-duper week!

    X

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  33. Herman TurnipFebruary 17, 2014

    There's something inherently powerful about a well-composed black and white photo. Done poorly and they come off as pretentious, but done well like your offerings then they convey a sense of power. I really like your "The Secret Door" and "Detail in Architecture"!

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  34. "There's something inherently powerful about a well-composed black and white photo."

    Yes, there is, you're right Herman. And I think that's why I'm so drawn to B&W photographs because they can be both stark, yet extremely powerful and emotional.

    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy. Hope your long weekend was awesome! Have a super week!

    X to you, Karin, and Mr. Tyler!

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  35. Ron, I got home from today and had time before I had to meet up with a friend for dinner, so I watched the documentary you suggested on Ansel Adams. And all I can say is WOW! I now have a better appreciation for this man and the dedication he had to his craft. What an amazing life because he lived it for his art. And I'm not going to lie, I got very emotional at end of the documentary.


    Thank you for sharing it, dude!

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  36. Matt, I am soooooo glad to hear you watched the video and enjoyed as much as I did. Wasn't it a super documentary? And yes, he lived his life for his art; almost as a vocation.


    And yup...I got VERY emotional at the end of it too. The documentary was so beautifully done!


    Thanks so much for stopping back and letting me know, bud!

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  37. Ron, I will go ahead and warn you: this might be a long comment. I have a problem doing short ones, sometimes. Ahem.


    First of all, your photographs are amazing, stunning, beautiful... I don't really have the right words to describe them. Something closer to perfect would be better; I think "The Secret Door" is awe-inspiring, but "Water and Steel" stands head and shoulders above the rest for me, which is saying quite a bit, because they are all intimidating, in terms of their beauty. The way you captured each droplet of water is... well, it just blows me away.


    Secondly, I agree, black and white photography has always grabbed me in a way that color never could. Possibly, this goes back to the first person who I thought of as "a photographer"; as opposed to someone who just took pictures. My cousin (who also has a blog, but he's a pretty private person, I think, so I'm not sure whether he would want the attention - I'll have to ask him if he minds me sharing his blog with you or others) inspired me in so many ways, but he is a bit older than I, and again, a very private person in many ways, so I've never really been able to articulate how important of a person he has been to me. Not to say too much just yet, but one day, I hope I can figure out the words to say to him - and to all the other influential people in my life - that, whether they realized it or not, if it were not for them, I would not be the person I am today. I feel an endless debt of gratitude to these people - and I worry constantly that my inarticulateness (and outright shyness) has made them think I did not care about them - or worst of all! - that I was even ashamed of them. Maybe I just worry too much!


    Sorry for this lengthy comment, but as usual, you have an understated way of saying things and showing things that are absolutely wonderful!

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  38. Nathaniel, I ALWAYS your comments, buddy! And I enjoy them because you really converse. Your comments are like having a conversation, so don't ever concern yourself with the length because I thoroughly enjoy your thoughts and reflections. You are a very insightful man; sharing things that allow me to think and feel. And that's what I love about blogging and comments - the sharing.

    " and I worry constantly that my inarticulateness"



    Yet, I see you as extremely articulate.


    Your cousin sounds like a very cool guy. And I think it's so touching that he's had such a profound influence on you.


    And yes, if he wouldn't mind, I would be more than happy to visit his blog, but I do know some people like to keep their blogs private. Me, I'm not a private person when it comes to my blog, as not only do I share it with those who I blog with, but also my family, friends, and a few people I work with. There are certain things (boundaries) I won't share on my blog, when it comes to myself and discussing other people (respecting their privacy), but I'm pretty much an open book here.


    Thank you so much for kind and supportive words about my photographs. I still have much to learn about this art form, but am enjoying the process. I'm a self-teaching person because I enjoy investigating and researching, then trying it out myself; learning through trial and error.


    The photograph of the water and steel I shot using the 'macro' setting on my camera, which gives that photo a 'closeup' of the water drops.


    Thanks so much for stopping by today, Nathaniel. Always a delight to read your comments. Have a super week!


    X

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  39. Beautiful pics Ron! You're right - they are much more powerful in black & white! It used to be black & white looked old-fashioned, but not now - it gives pics a level of detail you often miss with all the colors! Have a great week!

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  40. Thanks, Benze :)

    " It used to be black & white looked old-fashioned, but not now - it gives pics a level of detail you often miss with all the colors!"



    Exactly! I think color is great too for capturing certain images (such as a brightly colored flower), but black and white is just so awesome for capturing detail in an image that has more highlights and low lights.


    Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend. Have a grrrreat week too!
    X

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  41. Ansel Adams was so amazing. And YOUR work just keeps better and better. I really mean that! You have such a gift.

    I've always loved black and white photos. My favorite photographer is Eugène Atget. Not sure if you're familiar with him but I think you will really appreciate his work. He photographed Paris in the early 1900's.

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  42. David OliverFebruary 18, 2014

    I managed to watch some of it. And that some was truly beautiful. I would find it anathema to argue with anyone who searches for beauty and redemption.


    Of course I would have watched it all if possible. My internet provider is just too slow. Even pausing it did not work well. I will try to see it sometime when I have better access to the internet.

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  43. Hello there David!

    So glad to you hear you enjoyed the documentary, buddy! Wasn't it BEAUTIFUL?

    " I would find it anathema to argue with anyone who searches for beauty and redemption."

    Me too! His photography was almost like a spiritual vocation with nature.

    Thanks so much for stopping back and letting me know you saw it. And yes, you can go back and watch the whole thing later, whenever you wish. The video will be there forever.

    Hope you're having a super week, buddy!

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  44. Aw...thanks, Chrissy :)

    I am so enjoying the leaning process of photography. It's been such a great journey for me. I truly love photography!

    And wasn't Ansel Adams work AMAZING? And when you think back to when he first started taking pictures, he had to do all the processing by hand - no PHOTOSHOP - HA!

    No, I have never heard of Eugene Atget, but I will look him up tomorrow online for sure!

    "He photographed Paris in the early 1900's."



    Sounds like something I would LOVE!


    Thanks so much for stopping by, girl. Have a super week!


    X

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  45. I, too, love Black and White photography and remember the days when that is all that was available!! Ansel Adams is absolutely awesome!! You really are an amazing photographer Ron! Hope all's well!! xo Jeanne and the girlz

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  46. Hey there Jeanne!

    "...and remember the days when that is all that was available!!"

    HA! I know, can you believe that? Even Polaroid cameras came with only black and white film.

    Isn't Ansel Adams awesome? Love his work!

    Much thanks for stopping by, my friend. Have a WONDERFUL Wednesday!

    X to you and the girlz!

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  47. Your shot of the "Secret Door" is freaking awesome! The light and shadows play perfectly with one another. It's gallery quality my friend. Seriously!


    Your "Detail in Architecture" pic made me think of M.C. Escher. I could see him drawing something like this.


    I've always preferred B&W photography over color. Can't really put my finger on exactly why though. It's just something that's within my soul I guess. I find it really pleasing to my senses and although it may seem simplistic because of it's lack of color to some, it has the opposite effect with me. I find myself looking at B&W photos much longer than their color counterparts. The textures are richer and the layers within the frames are infinately more intense.


    Good stuff Ron!

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  48. Hey there Jeff!!!!!!!!!!

    Thank you :) I'm starting to get more into experimenting with my new camera, using the manual setting, rather than shooting everything in auto-mode. It's been just an enjoyable learning process.

    "Your "Detail in Architecture" pic made me think of M.C. Escher. I could see him drawing something like this."

    Hey, I never thought of that but you're right. It's does look like a drawing from M.C. Escher. I LOVE his stuff!

    "I've always preferred B&W photography over color. Can't really put my finger on exactly why though. It's just something that's within my soul I guess."

    Me as well, it's something I feel within my soul. Black and white photography seems to touch me deeply on so many levels.

    "I find myself looking at B&W photos much longer than their color counterparts. The textures are richer and the layers within the frames are infinately more intense."

    Yes, exactly! I do the same thing, I find myself looking at B&W photos longer. And as you shared, the TEXTURES are richer and more intense. In fact, it's funny you mentioned that because I just recently left a comment on someones blog who photographs a lot in B&W, and said the same thing - I loved the textures he captured in his photographs.

    Thanks so much for stopping by, buddy. Have a faaaaaaaabulous weekend!

    X

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  49. "There is something so simple and clean about black and white film, yet at the same time very emotional and dramatic." --- Yes. Exactly. I love ALL THINGS black & white!

    And these photos are simply INCREDIBLE! Wow. Thank you for sharing!

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  50. Thank you, Meleah :)

    "Yes. Exactly. I love ALL THINGS black & white!"

    Yes, doesn't black & white ROCK? And not only is it striking to look at, but there is also something very SEXY about black & white photos.

    Thanks a BUNCH for stopping by, girl!

    (((((((((((((( You ))))))))))))))))

    X

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  51. Ron, everyone of these photographs is so beautiful, and each in their own way. I love your eye and how see an image. Your perspective is unique. You see things in a way I wouldn't notice, but then you make me notice, like the photograph of the clinging vine. I wouldn't have seen that to take a picture.


    I love the contrast of the first photograph of the skyscrapers and how sharp it is compared to the secret door which is softer.


    Black and white is so classic, isn't it?

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  52. These are amazing, Ron, especially the door (need I tell you that), but I can't get over the shot of the waterfall. It's almost like an artist painted it. I agree that black and white has the edge of some colour photographs, simply because the lines are sharper and the shades are deeper, as can be seen in the view of Snake River. Your man is right, colour can be a distraction.


    Happy Monday, and have a satisfying week x

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  53. David OliverJune 04, 2014

    I love black and white pictures every bit as much as color. Also I love sepia. To me some pictures turn out to be art regardless of how they are processed. And I know it is art if I take a second look and maybe third and...


    You've got some nice art photos here. I think my fav is the door but it would be so hard to say definitely. I love the light bulb.


    I'm pressed for time right now but will make every effort to check out Ansel Adams before the week is out.

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  54. Hey ho Robert!

    Thank you :)

    You know, since getting a camera three years ago has made me more observant of things. I find myself looking up and down and all around, noticing things I don't think I would notice if I didn't enjoy photography so much. When you start getting into photography, your sense of sight heightens and you become an observer.

    "Black and white is so classic, isn't it?"

    Absolutely! TOTALLY classic! And that's why I love it so much.

    Thanks a bunch for stopping by, buddy. Have a SUPER week!

    X

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